Tag Archives: National Coal Board (NCB)

Some More Old Stuff

Some More Old Stuff

Chasewater Railway Museum

Bits and Pieces No.3

These posts are taken from old publications, newssheets and magazines produced by the Railway Preservation Society (West Midlands Division). Chasewater Light Railway Society and Chasewater Light Railway and Museum.

This post is taken from the earliest newsletter found so far amongst the ‘Duplicate Magazine ‘ file.

I reproduced the first part just to show that our aims haven’t really changed in the last 50 years.

Taken from the Railway Preservation Society Newsletter, Feb 1961

What is our eventual aim?

It is obvious that we want to run a railway.  But what sort of railway is this to be?   What picture do we want to give to the general public?  We could push together a train, grab a piece of line and say this is a preserved railway.  But will it mean anything to the general public?

Each district will, inevitably, form its own collection of smaller relics which eventually we hope to show to the public in exchange for money.  As a railway enthusiast, a mass of cast iron plates, old faded photographs, tattered maps, dog-eared tickets and general bric-a-brac fascinates me and I can spend hours contemplating such a collection, but I would strongly suspect this would leave the general public with a feeling of mental indigestion and a fixed idea that railway enthusiasts are really mad.

Any preserved railway depends on the general public for the main part of its traffic.  We must study their interests and make sure that we attract them back and their friends to which they have passed a recommendation.  It must not be an overcrowded museum, but a ‘vintage railway’ — a living example of how the railways were run, laid out so the general public can see it tick.  The steam engine is to us a balanced collection of boiler, firebox, cylinders, pistons, crossheads, etc.  But to the ordinary man-in-the-street it is largely a mystery.  Our exhibits must be self-explanatory.  We must try to explain why the railways grew into such a complex system of competitive lines with so many odd connections.

I am not suggesting that we forget the railway enthusiast.  I am asking that we consider the picture we are presenting to the general public.  These points are not immediately applicable, but we should give consideration to them and encourage the artists and architects amongst us to sketch out their ideas on this basis.

Arrival at Hednesford of our T.P.O

January 11th (1960) was a red letter day for members of the West Midlands District when a 27 ton 1909 Royal Mail coach, purchased by us for £200, rolled into our Hednesford depot.

Sold by British Railways the 50 foot bogey coach, complete with letter pigeon holes and half-penny stamp post-box – as good as new – it has joined our other two museum passenger coaches, an 1895 Great Eastern Railway brake vehicle and an 1875 Maryport & Carlisle Railway coach.

The mail coach travelled up from Verney, near Wolverton in Buckinghamshire, and celebrated its historic run by charging up the batteries to give full lighting inside.  It was shunted into the depot sidings by an NCB tank engine.

Unlike the other two vehicles, the T.P.O. is too high to be placed under cover in our vehicle shed, but members are planning to lower the track to enable it to enter.

Final Passenger Train on the Churnet Valley Line

Frank Harvey

Twenty R.P.S. members were among the passengers to travel on the last train from Macclesfield to Uttoxeter by the Churnet Valley line of the ex-North Staffordshire Railway on November 5th (1960).

Some of our members had departed from Macclesfield early in the afternoon in order to break the journey at Oakamoor and again make the acquaintance of the station master, Mr. Lister.

Macclesfield was reached early enough for members to have a look round the town before returning to catch the last train.  Several relics were noted at Macclesfield (Hibel Road) station, including a NSR/LNWR boundary post.

Bellringers

The train left on time at 8.35pm behind Stanier 2-6-4T No. 42670.  The coaches were quite full, two of the enthusiastic passengers ringing handbells loudly for most of the journey.

A few people had gathered at nearly every station to watch the train depart, and at 9.48pm the train arrived at its final destination, Uttoxeter.  It marked the last moments of a regular passenger service on the Churnet Valley line for 110 years.

 

The  present Churnet Valley Railway is a volunteer-run organisation. The operating company, the Churnet Valley Railway (1992) plc, is supported by the North Staffordshire Railway Co (1978) Ltd., a Charitable Trust.

Activities recorded on film

BBC television news cameras have filmed activities at our Hednesford depot on two occasions in recent weeks.  Both items were shown on ‘Midland News’ and have done much to foster interest in the Society.

On the occasion of the first visit, members were shown at work on the restoration of the Great Eastern Railway coach.  Several of our relics, housed in the coach, were also shown.

The cameras were again at the depot on January 11th 1960 to record the arrival of the T.P.O. Several newspaper representatives also visited us for this event, a very full report of the work, profusely illustrated with photographs, appearing in the ‘Cannock Courier’

The Coalport Branch Line

 

Notes by D. Noel Draycott

This was one of three lines under consideration when looking for a permanent home for the railway.

On Sunday, October 23rd 1960, a small party consisting of David Ives, James Slater, T. Jones, Frank Harvey and myself visited the Coalport to Hadley line in North Shropshire.  Built by the London & North Western Railway, it runs from the very attractive Vale of Severn across high land and through an early centre of the iron and steel industry to a junction on the Wellington to Stafford line.

The branch had a terminus at Coalport Station which stands on a long shelf, part cut out and part built up on the steep bank of the Severn.  The station buildings comprise a booking office, general and ladies waiting rooms, backing on to the station master’s house.  The signal box was demolished and a ground frame installed shortly before services were withdrawn in 1952.  The goods shed has also been demolished, but the three short sidings remain in the yard.

Further along the shelf past the station, there is a carriage shed sufficient for four bogie carriages, and an engine shed for two locomotives.  These buildings are in fair condition, and the engine shed contains a large workshop space as well as a pit.  All these buildings back on to the hillside, and on the opposite side there is a pleasant stretch of wooded land before it falls steeply away to the river which forms the boundary of the railway property.

The line rises steeply from Coalport Station with attractive views across and up the Severn Valley before it turns away to cross pleasant rolling countryside to the small town of Madeley.  Here the station building is used as an office by an engineering firm, but the yard of some half dozen sidings is practically disused.

The line then continues to Dawley and Stirchley Station where a total of some 15 wagons of coal showed that an active coal merchant used the yard.  As dusk was falling, the tour of inspection finished at this point.  All the members of the party were impressed by the potentialities of the line for day trippers.

Before we left the area, we were fortunate to meet a resident interested in the line who presented the R.P.S. with smaller relics. These included an LMS inkwell, labels and official books.  We were very pleased to receive these on behalf of the W.M.D.’s collection of local relics.

Chasewater Railway Museum – May 2019 Newsletter

Chasewater Railway Museum 

May 2019 Newsletter

Model of the Cannock & Rugeley Paddy Train

Model of the Cannock & Rugeley Colliery

Paddy Train

In late 2017 the  Chasewater Railway Museum was handed a query from Ray Foster with regard to the Cannock & Rugeley Colliery  Paddy Train, which ran from Hednesford to the colliery in Cannock Wood

We have tried to answer one or two other queries in the time since, the latest ones being about the loco and the size of the nameplate, numberplate and the size of the letters ‘CRC’ on the tanks.  Some of the items are in the Museum collection so it was relatively simple to be of help.  Now that Ray has completed his ‘0’ gauge model, he has sent us a photograph of the complete train.  A first class job!

If anyone is interested in getting the parts for the train Ray can direct them to the sources, just add your details in a comment on the blog post.

Our congratulations to Ray on the completion of his model and our thanks for allowing the use of the photograph.

Chasewater Railway Museum – This Weekend , April 6th &7th, Coal Train Weekend

Chasewater Railway Museum

This Weekend , April 6th &7th, Coal Train Weekend

Chasewater Railway Museum – November 2018 Newsletter

Chasewater Railway Museum 

November 2018 Newsletter

 

Another new addition to the collection – Coat of Arms, Maryort & Carlisle Railway

Another new addition to the collection,

Coat of Arms of the

Maryport & Carlisle Railway

Chasewater Railway has a 6-wheeled coach which belonged to the Maryport and Carlisle Railway, before being used as part of the Paddy Train at Cannock and Rugeley Colliery Pit at Cannock Wood.  The Coat of Arms is a long sought-after object for the Museum.

There were 27 subsidiary companies in the group of railways which made up the LMS, but only a handful of them owned locomotives and rolling stock.

The oldest was the Maryport & Carlisle, which was incorporated as long ago as 1837.  It was opened in instalments and completed throughout on 10th February 1845, eventually owning nearly 43 route miles of line.  It enjoyed an enviable dividend record, which rose to a peak of 13% in 1873, and it was one of the most prosperous of all British railways over a long period of years.  It contributed 33 locomotives, 71 coaching vehicles and 1,404 freight vehicles to the LMS.

Two early types of transfer for the decoration of the coaching stock, which was given a varnished teak external finish at the time, have been traced.  One was a conventional script monogram.  The other consisted of the initials ‘MCR’ on a red field surrounded by an Oxford blue garter with the usual gilt edging, ornamentation and legend bearing the full title.   It measures 9¼ in wide X 11¼ in high over black shading.

A livery of green with white upper panels was adopted in 1905 for the passenger train vehicles, which blended pleasantly with the green of the locomotives.  Five years later Tearnes produced for display on both an armorial device which shared with that of the Central London the distinction of embodying neither name nor motto.

The transfer measures 10¼in wide X 16¾in high and is simple and appropriate.  On an ornamental shield Maryport (top left) and Carlisle (bottom right) are quartered with the arms of J.P. Senhouse of Netherall (top right), represented by the popinjay, and those of Sir Wilfred Lawson (bottom left).  Senhouse and Lawson were the first and fourth chairmen the company had during its eighty-five years of life.

Uniform buttons carried the same device.

Chasewater Railway Museum – Acquisition from the Cannock Chase Mining Historical Society

Chasewater Railway Museum

Acquisition from the Cannock Chase Mining Historical Society

This is the latest, and probably the last, book to be published by the Cannock Chase Mining Historical Society.

The Cannock Chase Coalfield has been covered by the series of books written by various authors over the past few years.  They are all on sale in the Chasewater Railway Museum, which is open on train running days.

Mick Drury, who wrote this book, and others in the series, starting with the Conduit and Littleton Collieries, followed by William Harrison Company Ltd., The Lesser Known Coalmines of the Cannock Chase Coalfield, Cannock Old Coppice Colliery (Hawkins Colliery) and, with the late Jack Sunley and Maurice Davies, Education, Training and Rescue in the Cannock Chase Coalfield.

The Cannock Chase Coalfield was fully covered by this series of books from the Cannock Chase Mining Historical Society and this left Mick, who was instrumental in the formation of the Society and, for a time, Chairman, with the completion of this book ‘Boots All My Life’.

All of the books are available in the Chasewater Railway Museum (‘Boots All My Life’ – £14.00) or by using the link below.

The book is priced: £14.00 + p&p.

And is available by contacting Alan Dean on:

westcannock@talktalk.net or enquiries@ccmhs.co.uk.

Chasewater Railway Museum – Nice New Acquisition

Chasewater Railway Museum 

Nice New Acquisition

This latest acquisition is a very welcome addition to the Museum’s collection of local Cannock Chase items.

Nameplate:  Foggo, 1946, from a standard gauge 0-4-2ST built at the Chasetown workshops of the Cannock Chase Colliery Co.Ltd. in 1946, using parts supplied by Beyer Peacock, together with spare parts accumulated over the years from similar locomotives already at work at the colliery.  The name derives from Mr. Foggo, the General Manager of the company at the time and the nameplate incorporates the year of build.  It became National Coal Board property on 1st January, 1947.  Transferred to Coppice Colliery in early 1954 and to Brereton Colliery later the year.  Scrapped by W.H.Arnott Young in January 1961.  Cast Brass, 21½”x 8¾”, the front repainted.

 

Cannock Chase Mining Historical Society Books

 Cannock Chase Mining Historical Society Books

No automatic alt text available.

Did you or one of your family work at one of the many Collieries in the Cannock & Rugeley area. If so why not get one of the mining books published by the Cannock Chase Mining Historical Society. There are 18 books in the series, each one covering one or more of the local Collieries. A very informative collection, written by the miners, who worked at them. These are available from Chasewater Railway Museum. Perhaps an ideal Christmas present. Contact me if you need more information.

Godfrey Hucker – 07751 448523

Chasewater Railway Museum Catalogue – Album 2, more local pit locomotives

Chasewater Railway Museum Catalogue 

Album 2, more local pit locomotives

This album contains more photographs of locomotives used in Cannock Chase Collieries.

Click on the link below to see the full list

 Album 2 Local Pit Locos- XL Files

The text on the pics is – Object number, description and manufacturer.

Click on a pic for a larger version and use the side arrows to move on.