Tag Archives: Old Railway Lines

Chasewater Railway Museum – Another Local Item

Chasewater Railway Museum

Another Local Item

A Single-Line Staff. 

A wooden staff with chain attached and three quite worn brass plates:

Holly Bank Colliery

Lewis Tileries

And Essington Wood

Essington Wood was the signal box controlling the Holly Bank Branch.  This information came from Frank Allen’s book :

“The Cannock Line – Fourteen Miles of History”

The staff was donated by Barry Bull.

 

Chasewater Railway Volunteers’ Day

Chasewater Railway

Volunteers’ Day, Saturday 30th March 2019

For those who would like to help but are not as young as they used to be there is always the Museum, we need more volunteers too – just move occasionally and we won’t stick a label on you!

 

Chasewater Railway Museum – Opening for 2019 this coming Sunday, March 10th

Chasewater Railway Museum 

Opening for 2019 this coming Sunday,

March 10th

It’s been a while coming with a great deal of maintenance going on but on this Sunday, March 10th, a diesel service is scheduled and the Museum will be open.

Chasewater Railway Museum – March 2019 Newsletter

Chasewater Railway Museum

March 2019 Newsletter

2 pages!

Chasewater Railway Museum – February 2019 Newsletter

Chasewater Railway Museum

February 2019 Newsletter

Chasewater Railway Museum – Short article from 1930 magazine

Chasewater Railway Museum

Short article from 1930 magazine

While perusing an old magazine, our curator cames across this article about a railwayman from Pelsall. We thought that it would be worth another airing.

Walsall.

On February 19 Ganger John Jones, Engineering Department, retired after 51 years’ service.  He commenced as tool-boy in No.3 extra gang.  After 11 years with the gang he was made sub-ganger, and three years later was promoted as ganger, which post he had filled on the Norton Branch, Pelsall, for 37 years.  He had served under 10 inspectors.

Photographer unknown

NORTON JUNCTION

 Situated roughly half way between Pelsall and Brownhills stations and originally known as Ryders Hayes this Norton Junction in South Staffordshire was by far the largest of the many that carry the name on the British rail network. It became so large because of enormous production of coal from the mines at Norton Canes and Cannock Chase. Wagons were brought down to the marshalling yard at the junction on National Coal Board lines, with coal board locomotives, to be marshalled into trains of the right length to make their journeys onward on the national rail network.

Chasewater Railway Museum – Photo of Walsall Wood Station

Chasewater Railway Museum

Photo of Walsall Wood Station

Tha latest photograph that we have come across of Walsall Wood Station.

Not sure of the date but it was before 1964 as the Walsall Wood Colliery was still working, as can be seen by the smoking chimney in the background. This closed in that year.

The line contiued through Clayhanger to Brownhills West and into the Cannock Chase Coalfield – via, these days, Chasewater Railway.

Chasewater Railway Museum – Sans Pareil Black & White Photos

Chasewater Railway Museum

Sans Pareil Black & White Photos

While going through an old photograph album, David Bathurst came across some black and white photos of ‘Sans Pareil’ on one of her visits to Chasewater Railway, round about 2000 – 2002.

Click on a pic for a larger version and use the side arrows to move on.

Chasewater Railway Museum – January 2019 Newsletter

Chasewater Railway Museum 

January 2019 Newsletter

Wishing everyone a Very Happy New Year

Chasewater Railway Museum – A new item from North of the Border

Chasewater Railway Museum 

A new item from North of the Border

A signal lever collar from the Glasgow and South Western Railway, cast iron with a brass label, reading  ‘Train Waiting’  (Sorry, not very clear in photo.)

The Glasgow & South Western Railway was a self-contained system in south-western Scotland with a total of around 325 miles of track. Its terminus was at Glasgow St. Enoch and from here in connection with the Midland railway expresses ran to London St Pancras via Carlisle, in competition with the West Coast Main Line. The G&SWR also served the important towns of Paisley, Ayr, Kilmarnock, and Dumfries. The locomotive works was at Kilmarnock but was allowed to become very run down and locomotive production ceased after the First World War. Boat trains connected with the company’s steamers at Greenock, Portpatrick and Stranraer. The G&SWR achieved surprisingly high speeds on its passenger expresses, and was remarkably innovative in its locomotive design.

The 1923 Grouping was a horrendous blow to the G&SWR, who found themselves in a subsidiary role to their arch-rival the Caledonian Railway. The MR and the G&SWR had tried to merge several times in the nineteenth century but had been told by the Government that this would be too much of a monopoly.(spellerweb.net)

A hardware example of Railwayana from a company not well represented in the Museum.

These three items are all that we have, apart from the signal collar.