Chasewater Railway Museum – A New Acquisition Arrives

Chasewater Railway Museum –

A New Acquisition Arrives

The Hednesford No 3 Signal Box nameboard was purchased in December 2018 but was only delivered last week, along with two others.

The signal box was situated near Station Road railway bridge.

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It’s always good to add local items to the museum collection.

 

 

Chasewater Railway Museum – AGENORIA

The latest artefact to be donated to Chasewater Railway Museum is the nameplate AGENORIA

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The nameplate was originally fitted to a Midland Metro Tram No 15.

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Arranged by Councillor Richard Worrall, and Graham Wilkes, the plate was presented on September 10th 2019, by Anthony Stanley & Carl Williams from Midland Metro

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Although not strictly a Railway item there is a Railway connection, as Agenoria was the name of a historic local steam locomotive built in Stourbridge in 1829.

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Named Agenoria after the Roman Goddess of Industry, the 0-4-0 loco hauled coal from the Earl of Dudley’s Collieries in Shutt End, down to the Staffs & Worcester canal at Ashwood Basin. Withdrawn from service in 1864, it as been preserved and now stands proudly in the National Railway Museum at York.

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This nameplate compliments the other tram nameplate in the Museum’s collection, from No 5 Sister Dora.

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Chasewater Railway Museum – More about the armchairs.

Chasewater Railway Museum 

More about the armchairs.

Our curator, Barry Bull, has compiled further information about the armchairs, recent arrivals at Chaasewater.

After information received from Lawrence Hodgkinson a little more light can be shown on the two Manchester, Sheffield & Lincolnshire Railway armchairs recently arrived at Chasewater.

The chairs were originally acquired following a tip-off by Ian Smith, signalman and one-time Secretary of the Scottish Railway Preservation Society.  The armchairs, with others, were in the MSL Rly Directors’ saloon carriage and retained in this 1890 Gorton Works-built vehicle throughout its working life.

In its later years the saloon ended up as the District Engineer, Edinburgh Inspection Carriage No. SC 970113E.  Preservation was mooted but following accident damage in 1968, severe enough to result in its withdrawal and scrapping, some of the internal furniture at least  was saved, including the  two armchairs now at Chasewater, after many years in storage with Mike Lewis – to whom our thanks.

During Great Central days some modernising touches were given to the Directors’ saloon No 1033, which had been built by Parker at Gorton in 1890.  These included a big roller map of the system in 1913, to be seen on the left of this photograph of the larger of the two main compartments.  Photo:  George Dow collection

So far as coaching stock is concerned the palm for active service must surely go to Watkin’s saloon No 1033 which finished up as the inspection car of the District Engineer, Edinburgh, No SC 970113E.  Apart from its Gresley bogies and a modernised galley its original condition was unaltered when it was withdrawn for scrapping, because of severe damage in an accident, in the early part of 1968, at the ripe old age of 78.  Photo: George Dow Collection

Chasewater Railway Museum – New Arrivals

Chasewater Railway Museum – New Arrivals

The new arrivals are two armchairs from a Directors’ Saloon on the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway.  They cannot be called new acquisitions as they were first acquired by the RPS and were at Hednesford for a time.  The chairs were sold off when it is believed that the coach was damaged in an accident in the 1960s.  Through Iain Smith, railway signalman and former secretary of the Scottish Railway Preservation Society, the RPS acquired the chairs which, after their Hednesford visit, were stored for safekeeping by member Mike Lewis.

They were delivered to Chasewater Railway Museum by Laurence Hodgkinson in May 2019, and, although needing some restoration work, have been kept in very good condition by Mike Lewis.

Our thanks go to Mike and Laurence for their efforts on our behalf.

Detail from the back of the chair – MS&L

Chasewater Railway Museum – Colourful Wagon Plate

Chasewater Railway Museum

Colourful Wagon Plate

A new addition to the museum collection is this large – 14.75″x 9.75″ – wagon plate.

Manufactured by the Birmingham Wagon Company Ltd.

Chasewater Railway Museum – A New Local Addition

Chasewater Railway Museum

A New Local Addition

A worksplate from the locally built locomotive ‘Foggo’

Foggo, 1946, from a standard gauge 0-4-2ST built at the Chasetown workshops of the Cannock Chase Colliery Co.Ltd. in 1946, using parts supplied by Beyer Peacock, together with spare parts accumulated over the years from similar locomotives already at work at the colliery.  The name derives from Mr. Foggo, the General Manager of the company at the time and the nameplate incorporates the year of build.  It became National Coal Board property on 1st January, 1947.  Transferred to Coppice Colliery in early 1954 and to Brereton Colliery later the year.  Scrapped by W.H.Arnott Young in January 1961.  Cast Brass, 21½”x 8¾”, the front repainted.

5133 Photograph Foggo 0-4-2ST Built Chasetown 1946 – taken 2-8-1942 from spares and parts supplied by Beyer Peacock Album 1

The worksplate can be seen on the side of the engine.

Another new addition to the collection – Coat of Arms, Maryort & Carlisle Railway

Another new addition to the collection,

Coat of Arms of the

Maryport & Carlisle Railway

Chasewater Railway has a 6-wheeled coach which belonged to the Maryport and Carlisle Railway, before being used as part of the Paddy Train at Cannock and Rugeley Colliery Pit at Cannock Wood.  The Coat of Arms is a long sought-after object for the Museum.

There were 27 subsidiary companies in the group of railways which made up the LMS, but only a handful of them owned locomotives and rolling stock.

The oldest was the Maryport & Carlisle, which was incorporated as long ago as 1837.  It was opened in instalments and completed throughout on 10th February 1845, eventually owning nearly 43 route miles of line.  It enjoyed an enviable dividend record, which rose to a peak of 13% in 1873, and it was one of the most prosperous of all British railways over a long period of years.  It contributed 33 locomotives, 71 coaching vehicles and 1,404 freight vehicles to the LMS.

Two early types of transfer for the decoration of the coaching stock, which was given a varnished teak external finish at the time, have been traced.  One was a conventional script monogram.  The other consisted of the initials ‘MCR’ on a red field surrounded by an Oxford blue garter with the usual gilt edging, ornamentation and legend bearing the full title.   It measures 9¼ in wide X 11¼ in high over black shading.

A livery of green with white upper panels was adopted in 1905 for the passenger train vehicles, which blended pleasantly with the green of the locomotives.  Five years later Tearnes produced for display on both an armorial device which shared with that of the Central London the distinction of embodying neither name nor motto.

The transfer measures 10¼in wide X 16¾in high and is simple and appropriate.  On an ornamental shield Maryport (top left) and Carlisle (bottom right) are quartered with the arms of J.P. Senhouse of Netherall (top right), represented by the popinjay, and those of Sir Wilfred Lawson (bottom left).  Senhouse and Lawson were the first and fourth chairmen the company had during its eighty-five years of life.

Uniform buttons carried the same device.