Tag Archives: Steam Trains

Another new addition to the collection – Coat of Arms, Maryort & Carlisle Railway

Another new addition to the collection,

Coat of Arms of the

Maryport & Carlisle Railway

Chasewater Railway has a 6-wheeled coach which belonged to the Maryport and Carlisle Railway, before being used as part of the Paddy Train at Cannock and Rugeley Colliery Pit at Cannock Wood.  The Coat of Arms is a long sought-after object for the Museum.

There were 27 subsidiary companies in the group of railways which made up the LMS, but only a handful of them owned locomotives and rolling stock.

The oldest was the Maryport & Carlisle, which was incorporated as long ago as 1837.  It was opened in instalments and completed throughout on 10th February 1845, eventually owning nearly 43 route miles of line.  It enjoyed an enviable dividend record, which rose to a peak of 13% in 1873, and it was one of the most prosperous of all British railways over a long period of years.  It contributed 33 locomotives, 71 coaching vehicles and 1,404 freight vehicles to the LMS.

Two early types of transfer for the decoration of the coaching stock, which was given a varnished teak external finish at the time, have been traced.  One was a conventional script monogram.  The other consisted of the initials ‘MCR’ on a red field surrounded by an Oxford blue garter with the usual gilt edging, ornamentation and legend bearing the full title.   It measures 9¼ in wide X 11¼ in high over black shading.

A livery of green with white upper panels was adopted in 1905 for the passenger train vehicles, which blended pleasantly with the green of the locomotives.  Five years later Tearnes produced for display on both an armorial device which shared with that of the Central London the distinction of embodying neither name nor motto.

The transfer measures 10¼in wide X 16¾in high and is simple and appropriate.  On an ornamental shield Maryport (top left) and Carlisle (bottom right) are quartered with the arms of J.P. Senhouse of Netherall (top right), represented by the popinjay, and those of Sir Wilfred Lawson (bottom left).  Senhouse and Lawson were the first and fourth chairmen the company had during its eighty-five years of life.

Uniform buttons carried the same device.

Chasewater Railway Museum – August Newsletter

Chasewater Railway Museum

August Newsletter

Chasewater Railway Museum Bits and Pieces 2

Chasewater Railway Museum

Bits and Pieces 2

These posts are taken from old publications, newssheets and magazines produced by the Railway Preservation Society (West Midlands Division). Chasewater Light Railway Society and Chasewater Light Railway and Museum.

Another couple of bits and pieces from the Railway Forum – Winter 1965.  The first is a display of name and number plates, loaned by one of the members, and laid out in the Royal Saloon – which left Hednesford  in  1970 for the British Railways carriage works at Derby for restoration and then on to the Midland Railway Centre at Butterley.

Midlands RPS Open Day display

An interesting display of locomotive nameplates and numbers was arranged in the Royal Saloon for inspection by visitors at the Midlands R.P.S. Open Day.

New locomotives preserved in Midlands

Members of the Midlands area, R.P.S. expect to take delivery of another locomotive later this year which has been acquired through the generosity of one of their members, Dr. P.G. Plummer, who has offered to purchase it for them.

The locomotive is a Hudswell-Clarke 0-6-0ST built for the Sheepbridge Coal and Iron Company in 1895 (Works No. 431).  It was transferred to its present location, Desborough Warren Quarry, Northamptonshire, in March 1951 and was due for withdrawal in July.  It is believed to be the oldest Hudswell-Clarke locomotive still in working order and once carried the number 15.  Now it has no number or name, although known as “Sheepbridge No.25”.

Painted in apple green it should be a valuable addition to stock already acquired, and will be of considerable use at the Chasewater branch line which has been leased by this group.

Two other locomotives have also been donated by the Whitecross Co. of Warrington.  They are Peckett 0-4-0STs of 1900 and 1904 vintage.  They were withdrawn from service by the Company in 1961, being replaced by two Fowler diesel locomotives.  They carried names up to withdrawal, the older being “Baden Powell” and the younger “Lancet” the nameplates of the latter being transferred to the Diesel No.1, and those of the former being acquired by local enthusiasts.  Only “Lancet” will be able to run again.  It is hoped to exhibit “Baden Powell” statically.

The second is about new locomotives coming to Chasewater.  Sadly the Hudswell Clarke, although we still have the loco, has never steamed here. The two Pecketts fared even worse.  The ‘Lance’ (not Lancet) 1038/1906 was scrapped in March 1972, and another Peckett – 1823/1931 was also scrapped at the same time.  The Loco ‘Baden Powell’ was in too bad a condition to be moved.  The other loco was an 0-4-0F a fireless Andrew Barclay locomotive 1562/1917 – scrapped in March 1973.
The articles were writtten in 1965, the photos taken in 1969.

Coming very soon – Burton Brewery Locomotives Day – Sunday July 15th 2018

Coming very soon –

Burton Brewery Locomotives Day

Another from Steve Organ’s collection – the man himself!

Another from Steve Organ’s collection

the man himself!

On the right track!  Chasewater Railway General Manager Steve Organ cheers the news that the line extension can continue as Lorne Grey, who is in charge of Centrac’s recycling operations, gives the project the green flag.  July 1998.

Some old photos of The Causeway

Some old photos of The Causeway

We have been given some more old photos, I think from Steve Organ’s collection. These are some photos of the causeway in the early days  at Chasewater Railway .

In 1982 the Preservation Society was forced to lift the track on the Causeway and commence work on an ambitious rebuilding scheme. Sadly owing to the Society’s finances and lack of support, the scheme collapsed and the Preservation Society was forced to close to passenger traffic for a number of years, even though work continued on basic restoration at the Brownhills West site.

A scheme to restore the Causeway commenced in May 1993, with the basic engineering elements being completed some 11 months later. Approx. 120,000 tons of fill material were imported on to the site for grading and compaction. With the completion of one of the largest civil engineering schemes in railway preservation to be carried out to date, work was able to proceed with the opening of Norton Lakeside Station. The station was opened in December 1995.

Click on a photo for a larger version.

Some old photos of Asbestos

Some old photos of Asbestos

We have been given some more old photos, I think from Steve Organ’s collection. These are some photos of Asbestos in the early days  at Chasewater Railway .

Click on a photo for a larger version.

Asbestos

The Chasewater Railway Engine

Hawthorn, Leslie 0-4-0ST, 2780 of 1909.  Built at the company’s Forth Bank Works, Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

 The loco has outside cylinders 14” diameter x 22” stroke, 3’6” driving wheels with a fixed wheelbase of 5’6”.  Weight in working order 27.5 tons.

Delivered when new to Washington Chemical Company, County Durham, which became a subsidiary of the Turner and Newall Company Ltd. in 1920.

A large industrial complex served by sidings and a half mile branch just south of Washington station on the line between Pelaw and Penshaw, the locomotive working here until 1933, when transferred to Turner and Newall, Trafford Park Works, Manchester.

The locomotive came to Chasewater in 1968 from the Turner and Newall factory, Trafford Park, Manchester, where asbestos was produced – hence the name.  The company asked for £100 for the loco and was asked if they could wait while the Preservation Society could organize a raffle, being short of funds.  Upon realizing the situation, the company generously waived the fee and donated the loco.

Chasewater Railway ran an “Asbestos Day Special” on 1st January 2012 from 10 am to 5 pm. This event marked the end of 1909 built Hawthorn Leslie No.2780 “Asbestos” 0-4-0ST’s current time in traffic and it’s 10 year steam ticket. The one day event will see Chasewater’s favourite steam engine, 102 year old Asbestos providing traction. Resident loco RSH 0-6-0 No.7684 Nechells No.4 was also in steam to accompany Asbestos on her last day as was Barclay loco ‘Colin McAndrew’. It was a time of celebration for the railway owned locomotive which is always very popular with our visitors, and it has been the main stay of service at the colliery line having arrived over 40 years ago. Shortly after the event Asbestos is going to be retired to undergo a heavy general overhaul. Subject to the required funds being raised we expect that the work needed to return it to traffic should take approximately three years to complete.

At the time of writing, June 2018, the money required to return the loco to traffic has been collected and available, but the time hasn’t!

Made In Staffordshire Gala – May 26th/27th/28th

Made In Staffordshire Gala

May 26th/27th/28th

 

Kerr Stuart & Co. 0-4-0 “Willy” the Well-tank (RMWeb)

Bagnall 0-4-0DH built Stafford 1961, number 3207 “Leys” (Foxfield)

 

Events News: Made In Staffordshire Gala – May 26th/27th/28th

Made in Staffordshire Gala

Our Chasewater Railway Made in Staffordshire gala May 26th/27th/28th. 10am-5pm each day.

Details of our locos appearing during the gala.over the upcoming Bank Holiday weekend “Made in Staffordshire”

Steam loco guest is Kerr Stuart & Co. 0-4-0 “Willy” the Well-tank visiting us in its centennial year having been built in Staffordshire in 1918 and Diesel guest is last but one built Bagnall 0-4-0DH built Stafford 1961, number 3207 “Leys”. Thanks to the respective owners for allowing them to visit us.

Home fleet locos representing Staffordshire are Bagnall “Dunlop No.6” and Bagnall “Kent No.2” plus Diesel E E Baguley “Bass no.5” with Bagnall “Myfanwy” availble to view nearing the completion of her restoration.

Museum, Heritage Centre, Tea Room, Model Railway, Gift shops, Bric-A-Brac and more.

Rover Ticket prices for this event are £8.95 Adult, £7.95 Concession, £4.50 Child 3-15yrs and Non-working members with valid card, 0-2yrs free. A fantastic value family ticket is £24.95 for 2 adults and up to 2 children. No passes or vouchers valid during the gala and for everyone’s safety strictly no track/shed/signal box access without permission.

For weather & travel updates why not tune into our friends at Cannock Chase Radio FM on 89.6 & 94 FM.

There are many exhibits in the Museum made and/or used in Staffordshire – pop in and see us!

Hope to see you there.

More info:   http://www.chasewaterrailway.co.uk/

Three old photos – pre-Chasewater Heaths

Three old photos

pre-Chasewater Heaths

These photos came from Steve Organ’s Collection

Going round the bend (!) towards Chasewater Heaths.  Looks like Arthur Edwards in Hi-Viz, don’t know the other chap – sorry.

A shot of the pld Brownhills West station with, I believe, Kim Wilkins.

P.Way gang with DL7, I think.  There are two chaps who I don’t know, those I do know are Arthur Edwards, David Bathurst, the 2 don’t knows, then Dave Pearson, Les Emery and, at the front, a young helper, Jim Bates and Andy Clegg – not forgetting Beckie.

The first post from another Steam Railway Forum with Chasewater Connections – Spring, Summer 1976

The first post from another Steam Railway Forum With Chasewater Connections

Spring, Summer 1976

The signals are set to go on the Chasewater Light Railway in Staffordshire.  Members have just launched a big recruiting campaign to get a larger labour force together for working on the picturesque railway around Chasewater Pool, near Brownhills.  Throughout the winter, work has taken place in the compound and on the track.

The Society was heartened when their Maryport and Carlisle Railway coach of 1875 was accepted for the S&D Rail 150 Exhibition.  It is believed to be the sole surviving stock from that company.

The Society has just re-vamped its own magazine to produce an unusual, yet chatty, style which should go down well with supporters!

Invicta – pic Mike Wood

Chasewater’s Barclay 0-4-0ST No.2220 of 1946, on which members have been working this winter.

 

Maryport and Carlisle Railway six-wheel third (No.11 of 1875), pride of the Chasewater Collection, before its journey to the S&D Rail 150 exhibition at Shildon.   Pic – Mike Wood

Rylands

One of Chasewater Railway’s unusual shunters is this tiny 0-4-0 diesel with spartan conditions for its driver.

 

A rare LNWR slotted post signal from the National Coal Board’s Cannock Wood Colliery, Rawnsley, now preserved on the Chasewater Light Railway.  Pic: Mike Wood