Tag Archives: Peckett

Chasewater Railway Museum Bits and Pieces No.93

93 Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces Autumn 1979 – 2

Loco Department

As it’s the end of a decade, a complete rundown of locos is given.

Invicta’  AB 2220/1946The loco was kept in reserve at the start of the season and was not steamed until June 10th and then chose to run hot!  As there was only two weeks to go before Transport Scene there was much gloom and despondency around as well as a fair amount of bickering.

The offending bearing was the rear driver’s side axle box and this was duly removed following sterling work by those stout fellows Messrs. Hames and Luker.  Inspection of said bearing revealed the cause of the trouble.  It was a well known fact that during her latter years at Chatham, ‘Invicta’ had been fitted with a brand new rear axle and someone had obviously forgotten to cut oil grooves in the bearing brass, leaving only two small holes to lubricate the axle – not very good – especially as one had got blocked leading to overheating so bad as to actually melt the bearing surface.

Swift alterations to the bearing saw the loco back in service within four hours and the loco has performed without trouble ever since.

‘Invicta’ is undoubtedly the loco to be used at the start of the 1980 season, following the annual boiler test.

‘Alfred Paget’ N 2937/1882The ancient Neilson has performed without trouble all season and is now awaiting its hydraulic test, after Christmas, which will entail the removal of the saddle tank and boiler lagging and cladding.  As its firebox has overcome its leakage problems it would seem probable that the boiler test will be passed without too much trouble.  The opportunity will be taken for a thorough repaint and perhaps even new boiler cladding sheets will be provided to replace the current motley collection.  There is every confidence of the loco working next season – the loco’s 98th year in fact.

‘Asbestos’ HL 2780/1909This loco has been the centre of great activity this year with up to seven people working on it at one time – unheard of before!.

The loco is completely dismantled and a thorough mechanical and cosmetic job is being done to ensure trouble-free running when it resumes earning its keep.

The boiler was lifted out of the frames in June and was finally despatched to Park Holland Ltd. of Hanley on August 12th.  It now seems as though the firebox repairs will be of the welding and riveting kind rather than uplifting of the foundation ring, following a further examination by our tame boiler inspector.  The boiler is said to be ready around Christmas time which will ensure plenty of work in the New Year.

Following the removal of the boiler the motion was completely taken down, followed by jacking the frames clear of the wheels to enable the wheels to be rolled out.  Removal of the wheels has enabled a thorough paint job to be done on the frames, at present five coats have been applied with at least one more to follow.  To enable all members to feel part of the restoration team a couple of carriage and wagon tappers were roped in for a paint session (only undercoats of course!) though with the onset of stormy weather they have been despatched back to their rightful place fending off the bitter easterly winds off the workshop area.

Removal of the wheels will enable tyre turning to take place, probably at Bridgnorth.  The valves and motion have had attention with reassembly following, as far as the lack of wheels will allow anyway!  Whilst Brian has been busy machining the regulator valve to allow greater use of the steam produced.  All concerned with the restoration of the loco are confident of seeing it in steam next year.

‘The Colonel’ P 1341/1914The hydraulic test was passed in July, followed by refitting of the boiler cladding and lagging since when not much has been done save for the two Bobs (and others) finishing off the new coal bunker which looks rather fine.  Providing the tank can be repaired the loco should see service next year.

‘Peckett’ 917/1902No work has been done on this loco apart from routine preservative maintenance, but the situation should change once ‘Asbestos’ is back in traffic, as it is the next loco due for ‘works’ treatment.

Hudswell Clarke 431/1895Following a relatively ‘light job’ on Peckett 917 the ‘old Hudswell’ should get the full treatment though this is probably a good 18 months away at the moment. (32 years and counting!)

Andrew Barclay 1223/1911

This loco is in a presentable state at the moment but needs heavy boiler and firebox repairs before it can steam again – pity as the mechanics are in first-class condition.

’S100’ HC 1822/1949

The loco migrated into the compound and the boiler received a coat of paint, since when nothing, – where are you, Tony?

DL7 (RH 458641/1961)Once the loco was cajoled into action after removal to Chasewater it has proved to be a fine acquisition and it is to be hoped that the CLR Co. will have sufficient funds to buy it off the STEPS scheme.

Apart from working 5 days a week it has proved its worth on shunting duties on steam days, as well as hauling a couple of passenger trains on Gricers’ Day.  Once its future is secure the NCB green will disappear under a coat of CLR livery of some colour or another.

Others

Of the two Bass-Worthington diesels, No.21 sees occasional use whilst No.20 is rumoured to be going off on loan to the Bass Museum, Burton-on-Trent, which will be a useful advert for the Railway and give us a bit of room.(It went and is still there, 2011)

The two No.1s are performing sterling work as a stop block on ‘Three Road’ whilst various people mutter darkly about getting them going again.

Whilst on the subject of infernal combustion it must be mentioned that Bob Curtis has offered to paint No.21 as the Society is 21 years old next year.  Well done that man.

Carriage & Wagon Department

He DMU trailer coach has performed well as usual but the paintwork is now in need of some touching up, especially around the windows – so hopefully this will be done before it gets worse as, having seen similar coaches on a North Yorkshire Moorland Railway, it wouldn’t be advisable to wait too long.

Messrs. Pearson and Curtis have been busy painting the ex LNWR TPO and nailing panels back onto the Maryport and Carlisle coach.  We are hoping they will move onto the LNWR full brake after finishing the TPO as the paint is fast peeling off.

John Elsley is busy rebuilding the fire-damaged brake end of the ex MSL six-wheeler and it is looking better with every panel.  The only other item to receive attention has been the Great Western brake van which should get repainted during the New Year, following some welding to the platework which is rather thin in places.

johntisdale50@gmail.com

Chasewater Railway Museum Bits and Pieces No 83

A new arrival at Chasewater

Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces 83

Chasewater News 23 March 1978- Part 2

The first of two new arrivals at Chasewater was a 12” cylindered Peckett 0-4-0ST (No.917 of 1902).  This engine is being placed on permanent loan to the Society by Messrs. Albright & Wilson Ltd., who are one of the largest chemical manufacturers in the British Isles.  The locomotive is at present at their works at Oldbury and is believed to be in working order.  As well as being the oldest working four-wheeled Peckett in Great Britain it is also the last steam locomotive to see industrial service within the West Midlands Metropolitan County and it is therefore appropriate that it should be ‘retired’ to work on the only preserved steam railway within the West Midlands.  The loco should be an interesting and useful engine for use at Chasewater and it will arrive as soon as a suitable legal loan agreement has been drawn up.  Grateful thanks are due to Barry Bull for writing after the engine and to Albright & Wilson for entrusting the Society with their locomotive,

Further details will appear once the loco is at Chasewater.

From the Chasewater News 24, July 1978The legal loan agreement has been completed and the engine should arrive during August.

From the ‘Gricers’ Day’ report, 8th October, 1978.

Through the kindness of the Directors of Albright & Wilson Ltd., Peckett 0-4-0ST works no. 917 of 1902 arrived on permanent loan together with coal, 27 spare boiler tubes and various tools.From the Chasewater News 25, November 1978.

June 2010

Since its arrival the loco has been cleaned and the boiler and tank have been drained.  It seems as though some work will have to be done upon the motion of the loco, (which is very loose in places) as well as the major boiler hydraulic test, before it is steam tested.  It also requires repairs to the tank and will have to be fitted with a steam brake before working passenger trains.  Despite all this one is quietly confident of seeing it in steam at some stage next season. (This was in 1978 and sadly it still hasn’t steamed in 2011, or 2021, and is well towards the rear of the restoration queue, although it is now in the Heritage Centre workshop, since put outside).

Chasewater Railway Museum 1968 Vol.1 No.3 Bits & Pieces 42.3

Chasewater Railway Museum 1968 Vol.1 No.3 Bits & Pieces 42.3

Plus Stocklist – 1968

This is one of a number of articles included in this magazine – there will be another couple to follow later. I don’t know what happened to this loco, but in spite of it being purchased and delivered to Chasewater, it hasn’t steamed since!

Hudswell Clarke 0-6-0ST No.431 – By Frank Harvey

Working at Desborough – V F Hall

 

The previous issue of the Mercian featured several photographs of this, our latest locomotive, and it was felt that a short article about it would not be out of place.

It was built by Hudswell Clarke & Co., Leeds in 1895, works number 431 and spent most of its life in the hands of the Sheepbridge Coal & Iron Company in whose fleet she became No.15.  It was allocated the name ‘Sheepbridge No.25’, but this was never carried and with the removal of its official number and works plates ran its last years without any identification at all.

It has on two occasions been rebuilt, first in 1928 and secondly in 1944, by the Sheepbridge Company themselves.

The engine was first suggested as a suitable candidate for preservation some two years ago when it was one of several locomotives at work at Desborough Warren Quarry near Kettering.  One by one its companions were withdrawn leaving No.15 as the only workable source of motive power.  After closure of the quarry it assisted with the lifting of the track, until the early part of 1967 when it too was withdrawn and stored in the engine shed at Desborough in company with an Avonside 0-6-0T.

The RPS then stepped in and after pleasing, successful negotiations with Stewarts and Lloyds Ltd., the locomotive was purchased.  The firm kindly allowed us to steam the engine before purchase – and members will have read about this eventful weekend in the last issue of the magazine. (CRM Bits & Pieces No.41).

It proved to be in good working order and required little in the way of attention save for the fitting of two new injectors which have now been purchased, and the repairing of a cracked blower pipe.  Evidence of this can be seen clearly in the photographs!

Desborough, 1968

The locomotive was delivered to Chasewater in November and restoration is now well under way.  When completed it will be resplendent in apple green, lined black, edged white and a high standard is being achieved.Chasewater August 1969

Purchase and transport charges tended to deplete the Society’s funds somewhat, but all agree that it was money well spent and in common with all other RPS stock, no money is outstanding, a fact of which we are justifiably proud.

Although restoration is unlikely to be completed before 1969, we look forward to seeing No.15, the oldest working Hudswell Clarke, in steam at Chasewater later this year.In the Heritage Centre, 2010

Stocklist – 1968

With so many new additions, it was decided to publish a stocklist in the 1968 Mercian, Vol.1 No.3

I hope you can read it ok, it’s interesting to see what’s still here after 40-odd years, and what’s gone.

Chasewater Railway Museum Nov-Dec 1966 Bits & Pieces 38

From the ‘Mercian’ Nov-Dec 1966 Vol.5 No.6

This photo is quite a bit ahead of time, I think.  Not from this Mercian, but it shows the conditions being worked in.

From the Editorial

The AGM has come and gone together with the light summer nights which have speeded up the work at Chasewater.  Naturally more effort has to be concentrated where most needed during the few precious hours of daylight now left.

You will read elsewhere of the progress made to date both at Chasewater and Hednesford, so that when 1967 dawns we shall be taking our next big step forward, that of running a steam train at Chasewater.

There was a report about the ARPS meeting at Portmadoc, including a request for help with funds for theJ36 and ’C’ Class 0-6-0 when required so that the purchases might be concluded.

Under the heading of affiliations the following were accepted into the Association – M & G N R P S, and the Hull Preservation Syndicate as an observer only.  The following were deferred until the meeting in London on January 21st 1967 – Severn Valley, LCGB, GWR Trust, Westerham Railway Museum, Southern Railway Club and the Loco Preservation (Sussex) Co. Ltd.

There was a short report about the ‘Forum’ magazine, which was still struggling with finances.

 

Hon. Secretary

Progress Report

Work has continued at Chasewater, the main task being the reinforcing of the embankment with fly ash, this material has been tipped into the cavities caused by the embankment fire (slow combustion), and effectively snuffed it out.

An ex Midland Railway flat wagon has now joined the fleet at Chasewater for use on maintenance work.  This vehicle together with the NSR wagon has been finished in battleship grey and appropriately lettered.  The MR wagon was kindly donated by Messrs. Thomas Boultons Ltd., of Froghall, Staffs.., of

Delivery has also been taken of the Peckett 0-4-0ST ‘Lance’ donated by Messrs. Whitecross Ltd., Warrington.  This has also delivered to Chasewater where it has been given a quick coat of green oxide paint to repel the rust which was starting to get a hold on the superstructure.

Andrew Barclay 0-4-0ST. Colin McAndrew – Considerable work has been done on this locomotive by Allan Civil and his team of ex Bagnall fitters.

We are extremely grateful to this team for all the hard work they have put in to get it ready for the hydraulic test which it successfully passed.  The loco was steamed successfully on November 13th, albeit stationary.  We look forward to seeing her at Chasewater in the not too distant future.

Restoration Work – A small amount of work has been done at Hednesford on the E1 and coaching stock.  A start has been made on refelting the coach roofs, but has now been held up due to the weather and lack of manpower.  The small relics grow apace and receive the usual loving care from Nigel Hadlow.

Mention must be made of the wonderful job of restoration done to our Wolverhampton trolley bus No.616 by John Hughes and Robin Oliver.  These two members must be congratulated on their steadfast painstaking work in putting the interior back to its original layout.

Other than a couple of mentions for the Tote and the Annual Dinner that’s pretty much the lot for this edition.

Chasewater Railway Museum Nov-Dec 1966 Bits & Pieces 38

Chasewater Railway Museum Nov-Dec 1966 Bits & Pieces 38

From the ‘Mercian’ Nov-Dec 1966 Vol.5 No.6

From the Editorial

 

The AGM has come and gone together with the light summer nights which have speeded up the work at Chasewater.  Naturally more effort has to be concentrated where most needed during the few precious hours of daylight now left.

You will read elsewhere of the progress made to date both at Chasewater and Hednesford, so that when 1967 dawns we shall be taking our next big step forward, that of running a steam train at Chasewater.

There was a report about the ARPS meeting at Portmadoc, including a request for help with funds for theJ36 and ’C’ Class 0-6-0 when required so that the purchases might be concluded.

Under the heading of affiliations the following were accepted into the Association – M & G N R P S, and the Hull Preservation Syndicate as an observer only.  The following were deferred until the meeting in London on January 21st 1967 – Severn Valley, LCGB, GWR Trust, Westerham Railway Museum, Southern Railway Club and the Loco Preservation (Sussex) Co. Ltd.

There was a short report about the ‘Forum’ magazine, which was still struggling with finances.

 

Hon. Secretary

Progress Report

Work has continued at Chasewater, the main task being the reinforcing of the embankment with fly ash, this material has been tipped into the cavities caused by the embankment fire (slow combustion), and effectively snuffed it out.

An ex Midland Railway flat wagon has now joined the fleet at Chasewater for use on maintenance work.  This vehicle together with the NSR wagon has been finished in battleship grey and appropriately lettered.  The MR wagon was kindly donated by Messrs. Thomas Boultons Ltd., of Froghall, Staffs.., of

Delivery has also been taken of the Peckett 0-4-0ST ‘Lance’ donated by Messrs. Whitecross Ltd., Warrington.  This has also delivered to Chasewater where it has been given a quick coat of green oxide paint to repel the rust which was starting to get a hold on the superstructure.

Andrew Barclay 0-4-0ST. Colin McAndrew – Considerable work has been done on this locomotive by Allan Civil and his team of ex Bagnall fitters.

We are extremely grateful to this team for all the hard work they have put in to get it ready for the hydraulic test which it successfully passed.  The loco was steamed successfully on November 13th, albeit stationary.  We look forward to seeing her at Chasewater in the not too distant future.

Restoration Work – A small amount of work has been done at Hednesford on the E1 and coaching stock.  A start has been made on refelting the coach roofs, but has now been held up due to the weather and lack of manpower.  The small relics grow apace and receive the usual loving care from Nigel Hadlow.

Mention must be made of the wonderful job of restoration done to our Wolverhampton trolley bus No.616 by John Hughes and Robin Oliver.  These two members must be congratulated on their steadfast painstaking work in putting the interior back to its original layout.

Other than a couple of mentions for the Tote and the Annual Dinner that’s pretty much the lot for this edition.

Chasewater Railway Museum – Bits and Pieces No.28

Taken from the Mercian June 1965 Vol.4 No.3

 

There are some changes to the format and content in this and future issues of the Mercian, those that relate to the Midlands Area I shall reproduce – others I probably shall not.  The Editorial explains the changes.

 

Editorial

Since I took over the Editorship of Mercian last September, I have made a series of major alterations in format, the primary result being the last issue but one, and concerning long term policy, the last issue being the first of its type.

Mercian will now be composed of three sheets – as it has been in the last few issues; the extra two pages being devoted to a series of articles of general interest, for example:

Steam Locomotives of a Leisurely Era by Casey Jones.

Renowned Branch Lines by Tre Pol and Pen.

In the planning stage at present is a series called ‘ARPS round-up’, which will take a look at the background and work of the various societies and companies in the RPS.  This will be unique in that the series will be a joint effort between the Midlands area and the London RPS.

Perhaps my most difficult task is trying to cater for all tastes, as each series is not going to appeal to all members.  Whereas say, Mr. Gibson’s articles will satisfy all those interested in the evolution of railways, they do not meet the requirements of those who will find most interest in Casey Jones’ articles and vice versa.

One of the aspects not covered yet is that ‘Oh! so neglected’ subject, Carriages and Wagons.  Is there anyone amongst our readers who would care to write a series for us?

I hope that you will appreciate the changes, and the authors and myself would like to hear your views on these articles.

Another Locomotive

Members will be pleased to hear that we expect to take delivery of another locomotive later this year thanks to the generosity of one of our members, Dr. P.G.Plummer who has offered to purchase it for us.  Although Dr. Plummer is one of our furthest-flung members, spending most of his time in Germany, he does not let his distance from the depot dampen his enthusiasm.

The locomotive is a Hudswell-Clarke 0-6-0ST built for the Sheepbridge Coal and Iron Company in 1895 (Works No. 431).  It was transferred to its present location, Desborough Warren Quarry, Northamptonshire, in March 1951 and was due for withdrawal in July when the quarry closes.  It is believed to be the oldest Hudswell-Clarke locomotive still in working order and once carried the number 15.  Now it has no number or name, although known as “Sheepbridge No.25”.

Painted in apple green it should be a valuable addition to stock already acquired, and will be of considerable use when we move to Chasewater.

As it will probably have to be delivered by road transport, costs may be quite high and we would welcome any donations to help in this matter.

I am sure that all our members will join us in thanking Dr. Plummer for his generous contribution to our Society.

And Another and Another.

 

To take this good news still further, we have been donated two other locomotives by the Whitecross Company of Warrington.  They are Peckett 0-4-0STs of 1900 and 1904 vintage respectively.

Both locomotives were withdrawn from service by the company in 1961, being replaced by two most handsome Fowler diesel locomotives.  They carried names up to withdrawal, the older being ‘Baden-Powell’ and the younger ‘Lancet’ – the nameplates of the latter being transferred to the diesel No.1 and those of the former being acquired by local enthusiasts.  Alas! Only the ‘Lancet’ will be able to run again, but we hope to exhibit ‘Baden-Powell’ as a static display.

As parts are common to both locomotives, we should be able to exchange those necessary between ’Lancet’ and ‘Baden-Powell’ to render the former serviceable.  The company has also given us all the spares they possess, and have offered to give ‘Lancet’ a boiler test, provided that we pay for the presence of an inspector.  In fact the test should be carried out whilst this issue of ‘Mercian’ is in the post.

We will have to pay for transport, so please send any donations to the treasurer.

Sadly the Hudswell Clarke, although we still have the loco, has never steamed here. The two Pecketts fared even worse.  The ‘Lance’ (not Lancet) 1038/1906 was scrapped in March 1972, and another Peckett – 1823/1931 was also scrapped at the same time.  The Loco ‘Baden Powell’ was in too bad a condition to be moved.  The other loco was an 0-4-0F a fireless Andrew Barclay locomotive 1562/1917 – scrapped in March 1973.

North Stafford Wagon

 

We are hoping to buy a North Stafford wagon from the Shelton Iron & Steel Company of Stoke-on-Trent for £15.  The matter is now one of some little urgency, and the fund has been opened with a donation of £2 by the Secretary and myself.  Any donations for this interesting wagon should be sent to the ‘Carriage & Wagon Fund’ c/o Hon. Treasurer.

Progress Report

Work is now underway after a rather unprofitable winter, the main setback being the lack of numbers in working parties.

Greatest progress has been made upon the Royal Saloon; the primer of red oxide paint being almost complete.   This has to be rubbed down and undercoats applied.  With this coach being so large, the process of rubbing down will be no mean task, and anyone skilled in the use of ‘wet and dry’ will be greeted with open arms!

Brian Kinder and Maurice Harper are lavishing their attentions on the E1 ‘Cannock Wood’, and will shortly be giving her another coat of green oxide underpaint, whilst Mike Lewis is giving the GWR Merryweather steam pump a thorough overhaul.

Amongst the freight stock, the L. & Y.R. van is in the middle of a repaint, and is at present receiving an undercoat of red oxide.  Robert Ives is doing the same on the Midland Railway crane, which sadly needed this care.

According to information sent in by Mr. Plyer of the Great Eastern Railway Group, our brake coach was numbered 44, and built at Stratford works in 1885.  The GER Group own a similar brake to ours, and we offer our thanks to Mr. Plyer who has worked to furnish us with this information.  We are wondering whether any of our members could do the same on the M. & C. R. coach which will be structurally complete on the building and fitting of another door.

Our final piece of news is from Roger Bell who says that he hopes to STEAM the ‘Princess Elizabeth’ on June 5th at Dowty’s.  On behalf of the Society may I convey to Roger and his wife – who in no small way has contributed to the successful preservation of this locomotive – our heartiest congratulations!

Secretary’s Report.

I am pleased to report that due to the appeal in my last report several lapsed members have now renewed their subscriptions, plus a few donations.

A new rule to be proposed at the AGM is that all members not renewing their subscription over a period of three months will not receive Mercian or Forum and as such will be deemed lapsed members. The Society just cannot afford to subsidise these people, especially with increased postal costs.

The committee are now awaiting quotations for buildings suitable for use at Chasewater.  We hope to go ahead with plans for the building after the final permission from Brownhills UDC has been granted.

We should welcome help from members who feel they can assist with organisation of the Chasewater project.

Sir Alfred Owen has kindly offered the services of Mr. P. Srear, Director of Research at Rubery Owen to help us in this sphere.

D.A.Ives.  Hon. Secretary.

 

Treasurer’s Report.

Many people think that when a carriage is successfully purchased all worry automatically ceases.  In fact, it is quite the reverse.  Apart from the labour required to restore a vehicle there is quite often the question of purchasing the materials required.

I do not intend to bore our readers with details of restoration costs since most people are aware of the price of paint, timber and the like.  I would, however, for example, ask just how far a gallon of paint goes in restoring a railway carriage.  The answer is, of course, that it does not go very far at all.

So far I have only mentioned common-place materials.  Rolling stock consists of many specialised parts which are most expensive to replace if they are worn out.  Consequently, in many cases, it costs as much to restore a vehicle as it does to purchase it.

You can help, however, if not by donating money but by donating materials.  If you have the odd tin of paint or spare pane of glass we can put it to good use and you will have played an important part in restoring these relics.

F.J.Harvey.  Hon. Treasurer

Chasewater Railway Museum Bits and Pieces 2

Chasewater Railway Museum

Bits and Pieces 2

These posts are taken from old publications, newssheets and magazines produced by the Railway Preservation Society (West Midlands Division). Chasewater Light Railway Society and Chasewater Light Railway and Museum.

Another couple of bits and pieces from the Railway Forum – Winter 1965.  The first is a display of name and number plates, loaned by one of the members, and laid out in the Royal Saloon – which left Hednesford  in  1970 for the British Railways carriage works at Derby for restoration and then on to the Midland Railway Centre at Butterley.

Midlands RPS Open Day display

An interesting display of locomotive nameplates and numbers was arranged in the Royal Saloon for inspection by visitors at the Midlands R.P.S. Open Day.

New locomotives preserved in Midlands

Members of the Midlands area, R.P.S. expect to take delivery of another locomotive later this year which has been acquired through the generosity of one of their members, Dr. P.G. Plummer, who has offered to purchase it for them.

The locomotive is a Hudswell-Clarke 0-6-0ST built for the Sheepbridge Coal and Iron Company in 1895 (Works No. 431).  It was transferred to its present location, Desborough Warren Quarry, Northamptonshire, in March 1951 and was due for withdrawal in July.  It is believed to be the oldest Hudswell-Clarke locomotive still in working order and once carried the number 15.  Now it has no number or name, although known as “Sheepbridge No.25”.

Painted in apple green it should be a valuable addition to stock already acquired, and will be of considerable use at the Chasewater branch line which has been leased by this group.

Two other locomotives have also been donated by the Whitecross Co. of Warrington.  They are Peckett 0-4-0STs of 1900 and 1904 vintage.  They were withdrawn from service by the Company in 1961, being replaced by two Fowler diesel locomotives.  They carried names up to withdrawal, the older being “Baden Powell” and the younger “Lancet” the nameplates of the latter being transferred to the Diesel No.1, and those of the former being acquired by local enthusiasts.  Only “Lancet” will be able to run again.  It is hoped to exhibit “Baden Powell” statically.

The second is about new locomotives coming to Chasewater.  Sadly the Hudswell Clarke, although we still have the loco, has never steamed here. The two Pecketts fared even worse.  The ‘Lance’ (not Lancet) 1038/1906 was scrapped in March 1972, and another Peckett – 1823/1931 was also scrapped at the same time.  The Loco ‘Baden Powell’ was in too bad a condition to be moved.  The other loco was an 0-4-0F a fireless Andrew Barclay locomotive 1562/1917 – scrapped in March 1973.
The articles were writtten in 1965, the photos taken in 1969.

Chasewater Railway Museum Newsletter, April 2018

Chasewater Railway Museum

Newsletter, April 2018

Chasewater Railway Museum – Newsletter, February and March 2018

Chasewater Railway Museum

Newsletter, February and March 2018

 

Chasewater Railway Museum – A newly published book – Royal Arsenal Railways

Chasewater Railway Museum

A newly published book

Royal Arsenal Railways

Main cover photo from the Chasewater Railway Museum collection.

Royal Arsenal Book

The Royal Arsenal Railways

The Rise and Fall of a Military Railway Network

 By

Mark Smithers

The main cover illustration of the recently published book from ‘Pen and Sword’ on the Royal Arsenal Railways depicts the 1917-built Peckett 0-4-0ST locomotive works number 1491, named ‘Vanguard’.  At first thought this might seem an odd choice to show, but it must, of course, be realised that photographs at this important military establishment during its period of operation are not easy to source.

The reason, however, for going back to the original thought of it being an odd choice is that ‘Vanguard’ with its crew stands in front of coaches of the Brereton ‘Paddy Train’ having been disposed of a mere three years after arrival at the Royal Arsenal, Woolwich.  Following its sale to Brereton Collieries, ‘Vanguard’ soldiered on and indeed hauled the final train of coal from the pit on 1st July 1960.  Moving via Cannock Wood Colliery to Hamstead Colliery, ‘Vanguard’ finally went to the scrapyard during November 1962.

Page 145 in the book shows the same photograph as on the cover, credited to the Chasewater Railway Museum, the caption suggests that the view is towards the end of the life of ‘Vanguard’, however, it is more likely that the photo dates from the 1930s.

The Author, Mark Smithers, has produced a fine work, well-illustrated, on the railways of an establishment that contributed a great deal during both World Wars until finally run down and closed in 1967.

‘Pen and Sword’ website:  http://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk

Barry Bull