Tag Archives: Hudswell Clarke

Chasewater Railway Museum Bits and Pieces No.94

94 Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces

21st Anniversary Edition – 1

News from the Line

Loco Department

As a follow-on from the previous post, there is another comprehensive report on the locos, so I thought that I would reproduce it to check on the progress on the engines.

No.2 ‘The Colonel’

This loco finally entered service on Gricers’ Day, 12th October, after several test steamings.  Many repairs were carried out to the tank before it was refitted.  The loco appears to be very powerful and is mechanically superb and will come into its own when services are eventually extended.  The external finish however leaves a lot to be desired and it is hoped that the owners will rectify this in the near future.

No.4 ‘Asbestos’

Since the last report a vast amount of work has been carried out on this loco.  The boiler returned from Park Holland Ltd. in February after having the necessary fire box repairs.  Following this little work was done on the loco due to work on other engines but after mechanical problems with the ex MD and HB crane the wheels were despatched to the SVR wheel lathe at Bridgnorth and were back at Chasewater in October.  Their return signalled renewed vigour upon the loco and the wheels were stripped to the bare metal and given five coats of paint before the axle boxes were refitted.  The first weekend of 1981 saw the frames back on the wheels making the loco mobile again after eighteen months of elevation.  Following this the inside motion has been refitted and retubing of the boiler has started.  Hopefully the boiler will be hydraulically tested during the spring and refitted to the frames.  Although no firm date can be given, ‘Asbestos’ should return to steam this year.

No.7 (DL7)

The big Ruston has run trouble free most of the time and has earned its corn by performing several ‘master shunts’ over the last twelve months.  A rather garish ‘Bull inspired’ livery has been applied and has been met with the usual mixed CLR reaction to such creations.

I believe we should be told what the’Bull inspired’ livery was??

No.8 ‘Invicta’From Railway Forum, 1975

After another trouble free year the loco is in store until the new season starts at Easter.  Unfortunately the six-yearly hydraulic test is due at the end of June, immediately after ‘Transport Scene’ 1981 which will be its last appearance for a while.  The hydraulic teat will be carried out during the winter of 1981/82 and hopefully no problems should ensue.

S100

The dawning of a new decade saw the re-emergence of one Mr. T.R.Sale Esq. which has resulted in dramatic changes – i.e. the loco is completely strewn to the four winds!  The boiler was jacked up out of the frames and then lifted onto a flat wagon and finally deposited on a pile of sleepers next to the Great Eastern mess van.  The boiler inspector has been and shaken his head at three corners of the firebox and given instructions as to what must be done and where, which basically involves building up of wasted plate work and a dozen or so new rivets.  Following removal of the boiler the chassis has been dismantled and the wheels removed which are to follow in the step (?) of ‘Asbestos’ and spend a day or so on the Bridgnorth lathe.  Most of 1981 will be spent cleaning frames, etc. which should keep one or two people out of harm’s way!

No.12 ‘Sentinel’1992 D.Bathurst Collection

This is the first time that any progress can be reported on this loco which is the ex Walsall Gas Works Sentinel loco No. 9632 of 1957.  The loco is still at Butterley on the Midland Railway Project Group’s line but following various excuses and delays the boiler has been re-tubed, successfully hydraulically tested and refitted to the frames and at the time of writing new pipework is being fabricated.  Current thoughts seem to indicate that the loco will finally arrive at Chasewater in June or July.  For newer members it should be explained that the loco (in working order) forms part of the exchange deal for the ex Midland Railway Royal Saloon Coach which was agreed upon back in 1978.

No.20

This loco has been loaned to the Bass Brewery museum at Burton-upon-Trent for an initial period of ten years.  The main reason for this is that the engine is in need of a drastic rebuild and as the sister engine No.21 is in full working order (and newly painted) neither the time nor the money will be available to repair it in the foreseeable future.

Photo from British Locomotive Preservation – 1969

No.21

This loco is, as already stated, in full working order and was repainted by the Brothers Grimm to celebrate the 21st Anniversary of the Society.

Chasewater Railway Museum Bits and Pieces No.93

93 Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces Autumn 1979 – 2

Loco Department

As it’s the end of a decade, a complete rundown of locos is given.

Invicta’  AB 2220/1946The loco was kept in reserve at the start of the season and was not steamed until June 10th and then chose to run hot!  As there was only two weeks to go before Transport Scene there was much gloom and despondency around as well as a fair amount of bickering.

The offending bearing was the rear driver’s side axle box and this was duly removed following sterling work by those stout fellows Messrs. Hames and Luker.  Inspection of said bearing revealed the cause of the trouble.  It was a well known fact that during her latter years at Chatham, ‘Invicta’ had been fitted with a brand new rear axle and someone had obviously forgotten to cut oil grooves in the bearing brass, leaving only two small holes to lubricate the axle – not very good – especially as one had got blocked leading to overheating so bad as to actually melt the bearing surface.

Swift alterations to the bearing saw the loco back in service within four hours and the loco has performed without trouble ever since.

‘Invicta’ is undoubtedly the loco to be used at the start of the 1980 season, following the annual boiler test.

‘Alfred Paget’ N 2937/1882The ancient Neilson has performed without trouble all season and is now awaiting its hydraulic test, after Christmas, which will entail the removal of the saddle tank and boiler lagging and cladding.  As its firebox has overcome its leakage problems it would seem probable that the boiler test will be passed without too much trouble.  The opportunity will be taken for a thorough repaint and perhaps even new boiler cladding sheets will be provided to replace the current motley collection.  There is every confidence of the loco working next season – the loco’s 98th year in fact.

‘Asbestos’ HL 2780/1909This loco has been the centre of great activity this year with up to seven people working on it at one time – unheard of before!.

The loco is completely dismantled and a thorough mechanical and cosmetic job is being done to ensure trouble-free running when it resumes earning its keep.

The boiler was lifted out of the frames in June and was finally despatched to Park Holland Ltd. of Hanley on August 12th.  It now seems as though the firebox repairs will be of the welding and riveting kind rather than uplifting of the foundation ring, following a further examination by our tame boiler inspector.  The boiler is said to be ready around Christmas time which will ensure plenty of work in the New Year.

Following the removal of the boiler the motion was completely taken down, followed by jacking the frames clear of the wheels to enable the wheels to be rolled out.  Removal of the wheels has enabled a thorough paint job to be done on the frames, at present five coats have been applied with at least one more to follow.  To enable all members to feel part of the restoration team a couple of carriage and wagon tappers were roped in for a paint session (only undercoats of course!) though with the onset of stormy weather they have been despatched back to their rightful place fending off the bitter easterly winds off the workshop area.

Removal of the wheels will enable tyre turning to take place, probably at Bridgnorth.  The valves and motion have had attention with reassembly following, as far as the lack of wheels will allow anyway!  Whilst Brian has been busy machining the regulator valve to allow greater use of the steam produced.  All concerned with the restoration of the loco are confident of seeing it in steam next year.

‘The Colonel’ P 1341/1914The hydraulic test was passed in July, followed by refitting of the boiler cladding and lagging since when not much has been done save for the two Bobs (and others) finishing off the new coal bunker which looks rather fine.  Providing the tank can be repaired the loco should see service next year.

‘Peckett’ 917/1902No work has been done on this loco apart from routine preservative maintenance, but the situation should change once ‘Asbestos’ is back in traffic, as it is the next loco due for ‘works’ treatment.

Hudswell Clarke 431/1895Following a relatively ‘light job’ on Peckett 917 the ‘old Hudswell’ should get the full treatment though this is probably a good 18 months away at the moment. (32 years and counting!)

Andrew Barclay 1223/1911

This loco is in a presentable state at the moment but needs heavy boiler and firebox repairs before it can steam again – pity as the mechanics are in first-class condition.

’S100’ HC 1822/1949

The loco migrated into the compound and the boiler received a coat of paint, since when nothing, – where are you, Tony?

DL7 (RH 458641/1961)Once the loco was cajoled into action after removal to Chasewater it has proved to be a fine acquisition and it is to be hoped that the CLR Co. will have sufficient funds to buy it off the STEPS scheme.

Apart from working 5 days a week it has proved its worth on shunting duties on steam days, as well as hauling a couple of passenger trains on Gricers’ Day.  Once its future is secure the NCB green will disappear under a coat of CLR livery of some colour or another.

Others

Of the two Bass-Worthington diesels, No.21 sees occasional use whilst No.20 is rumoured to be going off on loan to the Bass Museum, Burton-on-Trent, which will be a useful advert for the Railway and give us a bit of room.(It went and is still there, 2011)

The two No.1s are performing sterling work as a stop block on ‘Three Road’ whilst various people mutter darkly about getting them going again.

Whilst on the subject of infernal combustion it must be mentioned that Bob Curtis has offered to paint No.21 as the Society is 21 years old next year.  Well done that man.

Carriage & Wagon Department

He DMU trailer coach has performed well as usual but the paintwork is now in need of some touching up, especially around the windows – so hopefully this will be done before it gets worse as, having seen similar coaches on a North Yorkshire Moorland Railway, it wouldn’t be advisable to wait too long.

Messrs. Pearson and Curtis have been busy painting the ex LNWR TPO and nailing panels back onto the Maryport and Carlisle coach.  We are hoping they will move onto the LNWR full brake after finishing the TPO as the paint is fast peeling off.

John Elsley is busy rebuilding the fire-damaged brake end of the ex MSL six-wheeler and it is looking better with every panel.  The only other item to receive attention has been the Great Western brake van which should get repainted during the New Year, following some welding to the platework which is rather thin in places.

johntisdale50@gmail.com

Chasewater Railway Museum Bits and Pieces No 84

Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces 84 – S100

Another new arrival at Chasewater

Chasewater News 23 March 1978- Part 3

The second new arrival at Chasewater Railway was a six-coupled side tank built by Hudswell Clarke & Co. of Leeds, works no.1822 of 1949 and is known as S100.  It is an interesting locomotive, the design dating back to 1909 when Hudswell Clarke supplied a six-coupled side tank with 15” x 22” outside cylinders to the Burry Port and Gwendraeth Valley Railway.  This loco was the BPGVR’s no. 8 and was named ‘Pioneer’.  Over the next ten years Hudswells provided BPGVR with another eight similar locos, though they differed in certain details of design.

S100 was one of an order placed by the National Coal Board following Nationalisation, being ex-works on 29-4-1949, works no.1822.  She was delivered to Whitwood Colliery near Castleford, as ‘Whitwood No.1’ and was later joined by two sister locos, replacing some ageing Robert Stephenson 0-6-0STs sold out of service  by the North Eastern Railway in the early 1900s.  For a period in 1955, she was sent on loan to the adjacent Walter Haigh Colliery, as she was again in July 1956, this time not returning to Whitwood, being observed at Allerton Bywater Colliery in 1957.  Later in the year she was at Prince of Wales Colliery, Pontefract.  In 1958 she was back at Allerton Bywater being completely overhauled at the adjacent workshops in 1959.  Following this she was sent in 1960 to Peckfield Colliery, Micklefield, where she was to spend the rest of her working life under Coal Board ownership.  In 1965 she was sent to Hunslet’s of Leeds for the fitting of a new steel firebox, mechanical stoker, new blast pipe arrangement and thorough overhaul.

Returning to Peckfield she was used intensively, being the only serviceable loco for much of the time.

By December 1968 she was at Allerton Bywater central workshops, following re-tubing at Peckfield, for a complete overhaul, being out-shopped the following October in red livery and carrying the number S-100, S standing for steam locomotive.  S100 was sent back to Peckfield and worked alongside an Austerity and latterly ‘Primrose No.2’, a Hunslet 16” saddle tank, now preserved on the Yorkshire Dales Railway at Embsay. 

http://www.embsayboltonabbeyrailway.org.uk

On arrival

A new Hunslet 388hp diesel which arrived in the summer of 1972 spelt the end of steam at Peckfield and in July 1973 she was tendered for disposal by the NCB and was bought by one Mr. K. Rose, ostensibly for scrap, but was soon resold to Mr. R. Walmsley, a member of the Society at Embsay.  The loco was steamed several times at Embsay and in September 1975 she was resold to Tony Sale of Aldridge.  By November of that year she was withdrawn from service and was in need of a complete major overhaul.  Being of sensible disposition Tony decided to move S100 nearer home in order to effect the necessary repairs and Chasewater was the logical choice for S100’s new home. 

Barry Bull bought a share in the loco and already work on the overhaul has started, with removal of the cab roof and se-scaling of the firebox, followed by a start on removing the boiler tubes.

S100 was moved to Chasewater on the 18th February by Messrs. Brackmills of Northampton, following several weekend visits to Embsay to prepare the loco for movement.

Despite press reports to the contrary the loco was unloaded fairly easily, the low-loader crew only being at Chasewater for 1½ hours, something of a record.

Thanks are due to Keith Rose, Charles Adams, Steve Fenwick and Martin Cleaver for their hospitality whilst the loco was awaiting movement and also to the lorry crew for their enthusiasm.

S100’s dimensions are as follows:-

Cylinders             16” x 24”                       Coal capacity                22.5 cwt

Wheel Dia           3’ 9”                               Water capacity             1,200 gallons

Length                 27’ 6”                                      Boiler Pressure            160 lbs

Width                       8’ 9”                                 Heating surface        645 sq ft – tubes

Weight                 33 tons empty                                                     73 sq ft fire box

Weight                 42 tons loaded                                                    718 sq ft total

Tractive Effort     @ 85% boiler pressure – 18,570lbs

It is interesting to note that the left hand tank on S100 is off Whitwood No.4, being bought in 1976 to replace the original tank which was somewhat rotten.

Work on S100 is expected to take three to five years and will include firebox repairs, a complete re-tubing (tubes have already been acquired), overhaul of motion, wheel turning, re-plating of bunker and fitting of vacuum brakes.

By the time that S100 sees service at Chasewater there should hopefully be a longer stretch of line for it to run upon and it should be ideally suited to work here and give many years of trouble free service.

(As with Peckett 917, this was in 1978 and S100 still hasn’t steamed at Chasewater – although a good deal of progress has been made in the last few years.)

Chasewater Railway Museum 1968 Vol.1 No.3 Bits & Pieces 42.3

Chasewater Railway Museum 1968 Vol.1 No.3 Bits & Pieces 42.3

Plus Stocklist – 1968

This is one of a number of articles included in this magazine – there will be another couple to follow later. I don’t know what happened to this loco, but in spite of it being purchased and delivered to Chasewater, it hasn’t steamed since!

Hudswell Clarke 0-6-0ST No.431 – By Frank Harvey

Working at Desborough – V F Hall

 

The previous issue of the Mercian featured several photographs of this, our latest locomotive, and it was felt that a short article about it would not be out of place.

It was built by Hudswell Clarke & Co., Leeds in 1895, works number 431 and spent most of its life in the hands of the Sheepbridge Coal & Iron Company in whose fleet she became No.15.  It was allocated the name ‘Sheepbridge No.25’, but this was never carried and with the removal of its official number and works plates ran its last years without any identification at all.

It has on two occasions been rebuilt, first in 1928 and secondly in 1944, by the Sheepbridge Company themselves.

The engine was first suggested as a suitable candidate for preservation some two years ago when it was one of several locomotives at work at Desborough Warren Quarry near Kettering.  One by one its companions were withdrawn leaving No.15 as the only workable source of motive power.  After closure of the quarry it assisted with the lifting of the track, until the early part of 1967 when it too was withdrawn and stored in the engine shed at Desborough in company with an Avonside 0-6-0T.

The RPS then stepped in and after pleasing, successful negotiations with Stewarts and Lloyds Ltd., the locomotive was purchased.  The firm kindly allowed us to steam the engine before purchase – and members will have read about this eventful weekend in the last issue of the magazine. (CRM Bits & Pieces No.41).

It proved to be in good working order and required little in the way of attention save for the fitting of two new injectors which have now been purchased, and the repairing of a cracked blower pipe.  Evidence of this can be seen clearly in the photographs!

Desborough, 1968

The locomotive was delivered to Chasewater in November and restoration is now well under way.  When completed it will be resplendent in apple green, lined black, edged white and a high standard is being achieved.Chasewater August 1969

Purchase and transport charges tended to deplete the Society’s funds somewhat, but all agree that it was money well spent and in common with all other RPS stock, no money is outstanding, a fact of which we are justifiably proud.

Although restoration is unlikely to be completed before 1969, we look forward to seeing No.15, the oldest working Hudswell Clarke, in steam at Chasewater later this year.In the Heritage Centre, 2010

Stocklist – 1968

With so many new additions, it was decided to publish a stocklist in the 1968 Mercian, Vol.1 No.3

I hope you can read it ok, it’s interesting to see what’s still here after 40-odd years, and what’s gone.

Chasewater Railway Museum 1968 Vol.1 No.2 Bits & Pieces 41

More on the history of Chasewater Railway, now coming to the end of the 1960s

Taken from Mercian Early 1968 Vol.1 No.2

Hon. Secretary’s Report

This is the first time I have had the pleasure of writing a report for the ‘Mercian’.

As some of you are aware Mr. D.A.Ives resigned at the AGM from the post of Secretary, after eight years of Secretaryship of the Society, in which he has put in a tremendous amount of work.  I was elected Secretary for the coming year at the AGM, and Dave has very kindly stayed on as Joint Secretary, until I am fully conversant with the job.

There have been several interesting developments recently, which I might briefly mention, as they are all very new.  Firstly the Brownhills-Aldridge UDC have kindly filled in and levelled the plot of our proposed Museum at Chasewater.  Secondly our line at Chasewater is now an isolated railway – we have been cut off from BR by the removal of a level-crossing.  (Presumably the one at the entrance to Anglesey Sidings) Thirdly on Saturday 2nd December, 1967, a long-awaited member of our loco stud arrived – by road – a Hudswell Clarke 0-6-0ST, used until December, 1966, in the Ironstone Quarries at Desborough.  This locomotive was steamed by Mr. Civil and Mr. Luker (our expert loco-fitters) before purchase, and ran for some little while before they declared it a good purchase.  Fourthly we are now in possession of a weed-killing wagon from Holly Bank Colliery, which will be a useful vehicle.  Lastly we have the MR covered wagon ex bass Breweries, now at Chasewater.

Things have been happening in the last week or two, but as we still have to transport two coaches from Yorkshire, an engine from Warrington , and are assisting Mr. Wildish with the purchase of another engine for the Society, we cannot afford to be complacent.  We still desperately need labour and money!  Any help at all, in either of these directions, will be more than welcome, especially in the selling of Tote tickets amongst your friends, or coming along on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon fro a bit of track digging , or painting.

T.G.Cousens  Hon. Secretary

 

From the Chairman’s Notes

The Society had a new Chairman as well as a new Secretary, with Mr.C.E.Ives taking over from Albert Holden, who was thanked for his work for the Society, especially as the organiser of the weekly Tote, which has brought in hundreds of pounds to the Society.

In addition to the usual appeal for members to help with track work, there was also an appeal for help with the smaller relics in the museum, Mr. Nigel Hadlow was the Hon. Curator.

Also grateful thanks to our engineering staff both at Chasewater and Hixon, who are both restoring and maintaining motive power, I understand that before long, steam will be up at Chasewater.  Long may it blow off!!!

In conclusion a special thank you to one of our junior members Doug Hood, who spent most of his summer holiday painting and restoring stock at Hednesford.

Progress at Chasewater

As regular members will know a considerable amount of progress is taking place at Chasewater.  The present project is the complete clearing of all track.  This is a formidable operation but already a good portion of the Norton passing loop is complete and if progress is maintained the causeway over Chasewater should be reached by winter.  A weed killing wagon has been purchased and this will be put to use as each section is cleared.  The removal of the undergrowth has revealed the track to be in a remarkable state of preservation.

During the summer months the level of Chasewater dropped several feet ( the 2010 version really showed how it should be done!!) and the opportunity was taken to do some work on the bridge at the end of the causeway.

The works trains are now hauled by the ex Worthington diesel No.21 with diesel No.1 acting as spare engine.  The third diesel No.20 is at present being overhauled and will no doubt be in use in the near future.

At the beginning of October contractors working on behalf of Aldridge-Brownhills Urban District Council commenced the preparation of the ground on the site of the proposed museum and this stage is due to be completed by December bringing us one step nearer to our goal.

Although the winter is ahead work will proceed as usual.  General maintenance will continue to be done on Saturdays and track clearing on Sundays.  All members, old and new, are welcome.  The job is a hard one but as everyone who has helped agrees the sight of nice, clean permanent way is one of the most rewarding experiences we have yet had at Chasewater.

F.J.Harvey

 

Report on the Neilson Locomotive Fund

The fund was helped in no small measure by the running of a raffle, which made a profit of £92. 16s. 9d. (£92.84p) The figures seem very small by 2010 standards!

The income was £32.50 donations, £ 92.84 raffle and a loan of £80.00. The first payment on the loco of £75.00 had been made.  Payment for the locomotive has been guaranteed by the end of March – that is the other £75.  This leaves us £57.36 to move the Neilson which may well have to be moved to Chasewater in April, and another £100 will be required by then.

There followed an appeal for more funds – public appeals in the Railway Observer and the Railway Word had not brought in a penny despite good billings in both magazines.

Thanks to everyone for help with the raffle.  It is hoped that before the summer is very old we shall have Baird and Scottish Steel’s No. 11 in steam at Chasewater.

From an article by Gerald Wildish

 

A Weekend at Desborough by Laurence Hopkins.

Saturday 21st October, 1967. In spite of typical RPS weather, as members set out for Desborough we were in high spirits, and were looking forward to seeing the Hudswell Clarke in steam.  On arrival the members found a difficult task before them in that nearly three lengths of track had been lifted, between the points on the shed road.  While Mr. Civil and Mr. Luker got steam up, a start was made in lifting three lengths of track from an adjoining line.  This being done, and the engine having sufficient steam up, we proceeded to move the rail 60ft lengths up to the points.  This task was carried out in filthy weather, and half the distance was completed by nightfall.

Sunday 22nd October,1967. Transport was by Mike Lewis’s van, and having made ourselves comfortable, we proceeded on the way via the Chester Road, as Trevor had run out of petrol at New Oscott.  We then did a grand tour of Coventry City.  On arrival at Desborough, the remaining lengths of track were laid.  The track being completed, the engine was run out over the section laid.  After lunch the engine was put through its paces and found to be mechanically sound.  To sum up – we must thank Mr. Civil and Mr. Luker for the fine work they put in, getting the engine ready for its steaming test.

Chasewater Railway Museum – Bits and Pieces No.28

Taken from the Mercian June 1965 Vol.4 No.3

 

There are some changes to the format and content in this and future issues of the Mercian, those that relate to the Midlands Area I shall reproduce – others I probably shall not.  The Editorial explains the changes.

 

Editorial

Since I took over the Editorship of Mercian last September, I have made a series of major alterations in format, the primary result being the last issue but one, and concerning long term policy, the last issue being the first of its type.

Mercian will now be composed of three sheets – as it has been in the last few issues; the extra two pages being devoted to a series of articles of general interest, for example:

Steam Locomotives of a Leisurely Era by Casey Jones.

Renowned Branch Lines by Tre Pol and Pen.

In the planning stage at present is a series called ‘ARPS round-up’, which will take a look at the background and work of the various societies and companies in the RPS.  This will be unique in that the series will be a joint effort between the Midlands area and the London RPS.

Perhaps my most difficult task is trying to cater for all tastes, as each series is not going to appeal to all members.  Whereas say, Mr. Gibson’s articles will satisfy all those interested in the evolution of railways, they do not meet the requirements of those who will find most interest in Casey Jones’ articles and vice versa.

One of the aspects not covered yet is that ‘Oh! so neglected’ subject, Carriages and Wagons.  Is there anyone amongst our readers who would care to write a series for us?

I hope that you will appreciate the changes, and the authors and myself would like to hear your views on these articles.

Another Locomotive

Members will be pleased to hear that we expect to take delivery of another locomotive later this year thanks to the generosity of one of our members, Dr. P.G.Plummer who has offered to purchase it for us.  Although Dr. Plummer is one of our furthest-flung members, spending most of his time in Germany, he does not let his distance from the depot dampen his enthusiasm.

The locomotive is a Hudswell-Clarke 0-6-0ST built for the Sheepbridge Coal and Iron Company in 1895 (Works No. 431).  It was transferred to its present location, Desborough Warren Quarry, Northamptonshire, in March 1951 and was due for withdrawal in July when the quarry closes.  It is believed to be the oldest Hudswell-Clarke locomotive still in working order and once carried the number 15.  Now it has no number or name, although known as “Sheepbridge No.25”.

Painted in apple green it should be a valuable addition to stock already acquired, and will be of considerable use when we move to Chasewater.

As it will probably have to be delivered by road transport, costs may be quite high and we would welcome any donations to help in this matter.

I am sure that all our members will join us in thanking Dr. Plummer for his generous contribution to our Society.

And Another and Another.

 

To take this good news still further, we have been donated two other locomotives by the Whitecross Company of Warrington.  They are Peckett 0-4-0STs of 1900 and 1904 vintage respectively.

Both locomotives were withdrawn from service by the company in 1961, being replaced by two most handsome Fowler diesel locomotives.  They carried names up to withdrawal, the older being ‘Baden-Powell’ and the younger ‘Lancet’ – the nameplates of the latter being transferred to the diesel No.1 and those of the former being acquired by local enthusiasts.  Alas! Only the ‘Lancet’ will be able to run again, but we hope to exhibit ‘Baden-Powell’ as a static display.

As parts are common to both locomotives, we should be able to exchange those necessary between ’Lancet’ and ‘Baden-Powell’ to render the former serviceable.  The company has also given us all the spares they possess, and have offered to give ‘Lancet’ a boiler test, provided that we pay for the presence of an inspector.  In fact the test should be carried out whilst this issue of ‘Mercian’ is in the post.

We will have to pay for transport, so please send any donations to the treasurer.

Sadly the Hudswell Clarke, although we still have the loco, has never steamed here. The two Pecketts fared even worse.  The ‘Lance’ (not Lancet) 1038/1906 was scrapped in March 1972, and another Peckett – 1823/1931 was also scrapped at the same time.  The Loco ‘Baden Powell’ was in too bad a condition to be moved.  The other loco was an 0-4-0F a fireless Andrew Barclay locomotive 1562/1917 – scrapped in March 1973.

North Stafford Wagon

 

We are hoping to buy a North Stafford wagon from the Shelton Iron & Steel Company of Stoke-on-Trent for £15.  The matter is now one of some little urgency, and the fund has been opened with a donation of £2 by the Secretary and myself.  Any donations for this interesting wagon should be sent to the ‘Carriage & Wagon Fund’ c/o Hon. Treasurer.

Progress Report

Work is now underway after a rather unprofitable winter, the main setback being the lack of numbers in working parties.

Greatest progress has been made upon the Royal Saloon; the primer of red oxide paint being almost complete.   This has to be rubbed down and undercoats applied.  With this coach being so large, the process of rubbing down will be no mean task, and anyone skilled in the use of ‘wet and dry’ will be greeted with open arms!

Brian Kinder and Maurice Harper are lavishing their attentions on the E1 ‘Cannock Wood’, and will shortly be giving her another coat of green oxide underpaint, whilst Mike Lewis is giving the GWR Merryweather steam pump a thorough overhaul.

Amongst the freight stock, the L. & Y.R. van is in the middle of a repaint, and is at present receiving an undercoat of red oxide.  Robert Ives is doing the same on the Midland Railway crane, which sadly needed this care.

According to information sent in by Mr. Plyer of the Great Eastern Railway Group, our brake coach was numbered 44, and built at Stratford works in 1885.  The GER Group own a similar brake to ours, and we offer our thanks to Mr. Plyer who has worked to furnish us with this information.  We are wondering whether any of our members could do the same on the M. & C. R. coach which will be structurally complete on the building and fitting of another door.

Our final piece of news is from Roger Bell who says that he hopes to STEAM the ‘Princess Elizabeth’ on June 5th at Dowty’s.  On behalf of the Society may I convey to Roger and his wife – who in no small way has contributed to the successful preservation of this locomotive – our heartiest congratulations!

Secretary’s Report.

I am pleased to report that due to the appeal in my last report several lapsed members have now renewed their subscriptions, plus a few donations.

A new rule to be proposed at the AGM is that all members not renewing their subscription over a period of three months will not receive Mercian or Forum and as such will be deemed lapsed members. The Society just cannot afford to subsidise these people, especially with increased postal costs.

The committee are now awaiting quotations for buildings suitable for use at Chasewater.  We hope to go ahead with plans for the building after the final permission from Brownhills UDC has been granted.

We should welcome help from members who feel they can assist with organisation of the Chasewater project.

Sir Alfred Owen has kindly offered the services of Mr. P. Srear, Director of Research at Rubery Owen to help us in this sphere.

D.A.Ives.  Hon. Secretary.

 

Treasurer’s Report.

Many people think that when a carriage is successfully purchased all worry automatically ceases.  In fact, it is quite the reverse.  Apart from the labour required to restore a vehicle there is quite often the question of purchasing the materials required.

I do not intend to bore our readers with details of restoration costs since most people are aware of the price of paint, timber and the like.  I would, however, for example, ask just how far a gallon of paint goes in restoring a railway carriage.  The answer is, of course, that it does not go very far at all.

So far I have only mentioned common-place materials.  Rolling stock consists of many specialised parts which are most expensive to replace if they are worn out.  Consequently, in many cases, it costs as much to restore a vehicle as it does to purchase it.

You can help, however, if not by donating money but by donating materials.  If you have the odd tin of paint or spare pane of glass we can put it to good use and you will have played an important part in restoring these relics.

F.J.Harvey.  Hon. Treasurer