Tag Archives: Diesel

122/123 Chasewater Railway Bits and Pieces, Toad.

122Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces

From Chasewater News December 1989 – 3

A Tale of Toad – Part 1 – I.Newbold

Following the arrival of this Fowler 0-4-0 Diesel-Hydraulic locomotive, two problem areas were identified.  The first was the reason for its withdrawal from commercial use; the coolant pump had expired and circulated most of the cooling water straight out onto the track.  Also the starting batteries (all four of them) had decayed during the loco’s period of inactivity.

Having removed the water pump and taken it to work, it was duly dismantled, in my own time of course, and it was only then that its reason for failing became apparent.  The sump had obviously been apart before, probably for the same reason, but unfortunately it had been put back together wrongly.  The rotating carbon seal had had its fixed running face installed back to front, and the seal which had been fitted had the wrong diameter lip for the water pump’s shaft. This meant that water could get past the seal into the bearing housing.  Now this might not have been so serious as this sort of seal usually tends to allow a very small amount of fluid past as a lubricant for the rubber faces, and the bearing housing has a drain hole in its face to allow this to escape.  Unfortunately the bearing housing had been put on upside down so the drain hole was at the top so the bearings had been immersed in water and had also expired.

Fortunately at this time a rep for the carbon-faced seal suppliers paid us a visit at work and was hi-jacked for a while.  He supplied a data sheet giving seal/shaft dimension correlations.  Armed with this information the seal face was fitted correctly, a collar turned down to fit on the shaft for the seal lip to sit against, and some new bearings found.  The water pump was then re-fitted three times before the gasket face with the cylinder block could be persuaded to seal.  Two of these occasions were in the rain and, although there is a fair amount of room under the hood, you invariably end up with water running down your neck on various occasions.  By this point I had become convinced of the advantage of air-cooled engines!

The loco then served a useful spell of duty requiring only a split air-hose to be removed.

As the months passed, the batteries became more of a problem and a blowing noise started to be heard from under the hood.  Investigation revealed the cause to be a blow from No.1 or No.2 cylinder.  This engine, in common with many automotive diesel (or more correctly oil) engines has a single piece six-cylinder block with a pair of three cylinder heads fitted.  As the blow was from the cylinder to the outside rather than into the oil or water systems, the loco could still be used with care if required.  A new set of four six-volt batteries were fitted, courtesy of the kind auspices of the loco’s major owners, Andy Cavelot.

Now the fun really started, as any of you have ever messed around with older cars, through interest or necessity, will know that getting hold of the technical manuals is a major part of the battle.  The information that came with the loco appears to have made a successful escape bid (if anyone out there knows where it is please could we have it back, even now) and Halford’s didn’t seem to stock a Haynes manual for a Fowler 0-4-0diesel hydraulic loco, so we had a problem.  The engine fitted to ‘Toad’ is a Leyland 900 series vertical lorry engine, so I started by ringing the Leyland dealer who contract services our works vans.  He revealed tat the head gasket sets could still be obtained, at a price, but he did not have a manual on these engines, in fact only one of their staff could ever remember seeing one.  He did, however, suggest that I try ringing Leyland or B.R.E.L. at Derby.  Thinking logically for a change, I decided to start with Leyland.

123Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces

From Chasewater News April 1990

A Tale of Toad – I.Newbold – Part 2

I rang directory enquiries and asked for Leyland/Daf; phone number actually in Leyland, Lancs.  No such luck, their computerised system could not find it.  Oh well, try a different tack.  I rang BREL at Derby and after about four phone calls managed to speak to someone who knew the Leyland 900 engine.  Unfortunately, after speaking to him, I was probably more depressed than before.  BR had employed the horizontal version on some of their stock and they had not exactly been the most spectacular success story ever.  Initially the engines had employed a wet linered cylinder block, there had been a change in piston design, followed by a change in crankshaft design, followed by a change to dry linered cylinder block.  The last modification was to cure an inherent problem of blowing head gaskets, not totally successful either, he added.  The outcome was that he could not be sure which variant we had, even from the engine number, his only suggestion was to go away and measure the cylinder head stud diameters, find out if washers were incorporated under the head nuts, etc. etc.  As a final comment, after giving various gasket fitting tips, he said that in BR use a good engine of this type would run for about a year between blowing gaskets.  Our ‘Toad’, it appears, had done so every couple of years, Leyland must have been taking lessons from Crossley.

Parallel to this, I decided to try to find Leyland again, but how?  Ring up the British Motor Industry Heritage Trust thinks I, well they only deal with cars but their non-computerised system had a record of Leyland’s phone number.  Computers 0, Card Index 1

So, feeling a little perkier I rang Leyland – Daf as it is now, and after a few tries I got through to their technical publications department.

“Have you still got any data on the 900 series?” asks I, “Good grief” say they.  After a five minute rummage, I was asked to ring back in a couple of days.  A couple of days later I rang back:  Bad news and good news, they had disposed of all their old manuals, but most had gone to the British Commercial Vehicle Museum.  However, they could not guarantee their having passed a 900 series engine manual on as it really was an Albion engine, built in Scotland.  I could try the Albion owners club.  This I did, but they didn’t seem to want to answer the phone.

The other parallel course was still grinding onward and after a measuring session of head stud diameters, etc. I rang BREL back: the chap I wanted was on holiday.  Ho Hum.

I decided to ask the loco’s previous owners if they knew anything about it.  Now I don’t know if you have ever tried to find the phone number of a military establishment, but it’s not quite as straight forward as it could be.  Deciding not to bother with Directory Enquiries, I rang the War Office, sorry, Ministry of Defence, in London and eventually got the requisite number.  I rang Radway Green, only to be told that I had just missed the Head of Transport, he had just gone home.  I rang back the next day – he was not in.  The third day I rang I was given a vital piece of information, they were shut down for holiday, could I ring back next week?  OK folks, don’t invade us or declare war – we’re on holiday!

Next week I rang back and spoke to the head of the transport department, they certainly remembered ‘Toad’, but did not repair it themselves, some chaps used to come from ‘somewhere near Derby’ to repair it.  I was passed on to the fitter, who was uncertain about whether it was wet or dry linered, and did not know the head torques.

Not long afterwards I traced the British Commercial Vehicle Museum phone number, BT’s computer had this one in memory – shock, horror, anyway I gave them a ring.

“The chap you want is out, can you ring back tomorrow?”  This sounded familiar, so I rang back the next day and found the relevant person and gave him the by now very well rehearsed patter.  He sounded quite hopeful and asked me to ring back in a few days.  This I duly did and was rewarded with the information we required.  Just for the record, if anyone else wants to fit a Leyland 900 head gasket, the torques are:  200lb/ft on the ⅝” UNF studs, and 100lb/ft on the ½” UNF studs.  Eureka!  They could even sell us a copy of the engine manual.  It is at this point that someone comes up and says ‘I could have told you that’ – if they do I’ll scream!

Now all we’ve got to do is buy a head gasket and fit it….

Then there is the dynamo control box to set up……

Then the exhauster to fit…….

Then the……..

Update 2011 – ‘Toad’ is now owned by R. Fredwoods (not sure about the spelling!) and is awaiting a new engine…..

100 Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces – 1984 – 1

100 Chasewater Railway Museum Bits & Pieces – 1984 – 1

Chasewater News – Editorial

 The Society is approaching its 25th Anniversary which will be celebrated at the Society AGM on 13th October and at a Bus Rally and Railwayana Fair at Chasewater on the following day (October 14th) 11.00 – 4.30, admission free.

Throughout its 25 years the Society’s membership has fluctuated around the 100 mark whilst its aims have switched from creating a static museum to an operating railway.  Despite the lack of passenger trains during the last two seasons the Society membership has held its own and so far this year over 15 new members have been enrolled.  To these people we say thank you for having faith in the Chasewater Project.  Inside this magazine you will find a membership form and we are appealing for every member to enrol a new member to give us enough people to operate trains next season (as we are led to believe that we will be in a position to do so).

Members may have read elsewhere about plans to spend up to 14 million pounds on Chasewater Park and the Society/Company have drawn up plans to expand the Railway, should this scheme come to fruition.  All this is dependent on us having enough manpower to run services on a regular basis so it is up to the present membership to either come forward and operate the services or to find new members to do the same.  Members may also have read of a scheme to build a new motorway which may or may not pass through the park.  If it does come through the park then we are wasting our time.

News from the line

Loco Department – It has for sometime been felt that there ought to be a numbering system for locos at Chasewater in order to give a proper Light Railway image.

A start was made some years ago when ‘Invicta’ emerged from a repaint sporting a painted No.8 (it was then the eighth steam engine on site) on the front buffer beam and brass plates (GWR style) on the cab sides.

The following system has been devised and will be put into practice as engines are repainted, although the GWR style plates on ‘Invicta’ will not be featured on other locos as brass plates with the loco number and the legend ‘Chasewater Light Railway’ have been designed.  Some locos will also bear fictitious 21G shed plates as the Operating Superintendent reckons 21G would have been the shed code for Brownhills West (Hednesford Road) had it existed in BR days.

Loco                                                          No.

Hibberd Diesel                                 1                 First loco to arrive

Peckett 1351                                    2                  No. 2 at Wallsend Slipway

Barclay 1223                                   3

Asbestos                                            4

Sentinel 9632                                   5                 May be painted black as BR 59632

Peckett 917                                       6

R & H Diesel                                       7                 No.7 at Whitwell Colliery

Invicta                                                    8

Hudswell Clarke 1822                     10

Alfred Paget                                         11               No.11 at Gartsherrie

Hudswell Clarke 431                       15

Ex bass Diesel                                     21

L & Y Petrol                                            1

It seems strange to have two No.1s when starting a new system, even if they didn’t stay much longer!

Chasewater Railway Museum May June 1967 Bits & Pieces 40

Taken from the new look Mercian of 1967 Vol.1 No.1

Manning Wardle Littleton No.5 – RPS Trip May 1967

Progress at Chasewater

Work has continued throughout the winter and members are now looking forward to the lighter evenings.

A temporary siding has been laid in the vicinity of the platelayers’ cabin, on which the stock that is not normally in use can be stored.  The works train now consists of the ‘Planet’ diesel, which is in the process of being repainted, a Midland Railway flat wagon and a colliery company brake van.

Ditching at the north end of the line is almost complete and it is hoped that work on track re-alignment and clearing will take place later this summer.

Restoration work is in progress on the GWR brake van and NSR open wagon while the Midland Railway passenger brake has received a temporary coat of red oxide.  Much more work has to be done on theses vehicles and anyone prepared to help will be most welcome.

Stop Press

A major step forward fro the Society came a few weeks ago when it was announced that Aldridge-Brownhills Council have finally given us planning permission for our museum at Chasewater.  We have been awaiting this news for several months, and our grateful thanks for all the hard persistent work he has put in to keep things moving with the Council go to our President Mr. Charles Ives.  We are now obtaining estimates from firms so that the building can be started as soon as possible.

Progress on the Andrew Barclay loco at Hixon has been very good over the last few weeks thanks to the efforts of several members.  Painting of the underframes is nearing completion, and it should not be many weeks before the wheels can be put back.  When they are, the rest of the engine can have its final coat of paint and the motion re-assembled.  We are still hoping it will be ready to go up to Chasewater this year, so if you can spare a couple of hours and can use a paint-brush, please go along and do your bit.

We now have both of the Worthington diesels from Burton at Chasewater, fetched by our good friend Jake Bacon, where they have been put through their paces and proved themselves to be excellent machines.

Full Circle – L.E.Hodgkinson

No doubt some members were surprised, and perhaps apprehensive, when it was announced last year in the ‘Mercian’ that the Society had purchased a diesel loco.  A number of working party members put up the £50 to buy it, and our good friend John Bacon transported it from ‘Pitrails’ of Aldridge to Chasewater on his low-loader.  It is a very small machine, built by Hibberds to a very ancient design, and has to be started by means of a handle.Chasewater No.1 Diesel Loco being painted by Frank Harvey.

Since then it has been used to move track materials and shunt stock.  It has also been used for uprooting bushes and for ditch-digging!

Its mechanical condition was appalling, but has now been improved to such an extent that it is merely shocking!  Its low power and difficult starting caused us to look for a replacement.  We were fortunate in being able to purchase two Hibberd type diesels from Bass Breweries of Burton for the very modest sum of £50 each.  Bob Wormington purchase one, and a number of members donated the other.  The locos are of very robust construction, with modern Dorman engines complete with electric start.  Coupled in tandem they will move any stock that we have.  When they arrive at Chasewater in the near future, old No.1 will be retired as ‘spare engine’ and will once more be ‘stored out-of-use’.

Lest any member be disturbed by this ‘dieselisation’, remember that these are only departmental engines to prepare the track for when the steam engines arrive.  If anyone wants to speed up the return of steam to Chasewater, volunteers are wanted to help with the painting of the ‘Barclay’ engine at Hixon.

A Breath of Wales – N.Hadlow

A breath of Wales came to Hednesford on Sunday 16th April, when we collected a large bi-lingual cast iron notice from Bala Junction that had been purchased by one of our members.   The sign tells passengers to cross the line by the bridge, or as the Welsh version puts it –

‘Ni oddefir I deither I groes’r rheilffordd ond dros y bont’

and according to the BR invoice it weighed 2 cwts., but after four of us had carried it ¼ mile over a field to the road in the blazing sun, we reckoned it could easily have been 2 tons!  It is certainly nearer 4 cwts.  There are only two signs of this kind in existence, both at Bala Junction, and we would have had them both but for the fact that somebody else had purchased the other one!

Other relics keep on coming in from time to time, such as a GWR hotels fruit salad bowl, GWR luggage labels, forms, appendices to rule books and other paperwork, an LNWR gate notice, GWR and LNWR padlocks and several other items.