Category Archives: Photograph Collection

Some old photos of The Causeway

Some old photos of The Causeway

We have been given some more old photos, I think from Steve Organ’s collection. These are some photos of the causeway in the early days  at Chasewater Railway .

In 1982 the Preservation Society was forced to lift the track on the Causeway and commence work on an ambitious rebuilding scheme. Sadly owing to the Society’s finances and lack of support, the scheme collapsed and the Preservation Society was forced to close to passenger traffic for a number of years, even though work continued on basic restoration at the Brownhills West site.

A scheme to restore the Causeway commenced in May 1993, with the basic engineering elements being completed some 11 months later. Approx. 120,000 tons of fill material were imported on to the site for grading and compaction. With the completion of one of the largest civil engineering schemes in railway preservation to be carried out to date, work was able to proceed with the opening of Norton Lakeside Station. The station was opened in December 1995.

Click on a photo for a larger version.

Some old photos of Asbestos

Some old photos of Asbestos

We have been given some more old photos, I think from Steve Organ’s collection. These are some photos of Asbestos in the early days  at Chasewater Railway .

Click on a photo for a larger version.

Asbestos

The Chasewater Railway Engine

Hawthorn, Leslie 0-4-0ST, 2780 of 1909.  Built at the company’s Forth Bank Works, Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

 The loco has outside cylinders 14” diameter x 22” stroke, 3’6” driving wheels with a fixed wheelbase of 5’6”.  Weight in working order 27.5 tons.

Delivered when new to Washington Chemical Company, County Durham, which became a subsidiary of the Turner and Newall Company Ltd. in 1920.

A large industrial complex served by sidings and a half mile branch just south of Washington station on the line between Pelaw and Penshaw, the locomotive working here until 1933, when transferred to Turner and Newall, Trafford Park Works, Manchester.

The locomotive came to Chasewater in 1968 from the Turner and Newall factory, Trafford Park, Manchester, where asbestos was produced – hence the name.  The company asked for £100 for the loco and was asked if they could wait while the Preservation Society could organize a raffle, being short of funds.  Upon realizing the situation, the company generously waived the fee and donated the loco.

Chasewater Railway ran an “Asbestos Day Special” on 1st January 2012 from 10 am to 5 pm. This event marked the end of 1909 built Hawthorn Leslie No.2780 “Asbestos” 0-4-0ST’s current time in traffic and it’s 10 year steam ticket. The one day event will see Chasewater’s favourite steam engine, 102 year old Asbestos providing traction. Resident loco RSH 0-6-0 No.7684 Nechells No.4 was also in steam to accompany Asbestos on her last day as was Barclay loco ‘Colin McAndrew’. It was a time of celebration for the railway owned locomotive which is always very popular with our visitors, and it has been the main stay of service at the colliery line having arrived over 40 years ago. Shortly after the event Asbestos is going to be retired to undergo a heavy general overhaul. Subject to the required funds being raised we expect that the work needed to return it to traffic should take approximately three years to complete.

At the time of writing, June 2018, the money required to return the loco to traffic has been collected and available, but the time hasn’t!

More old photos – diesels, etc.

More old photos – diesels, etc.

We have been given some more old photos, I think from Steve Organ’s collection.  These are some of the old diesel/petrol locos which were at Chasewater Railway early on.

Click on a photo for a larger version.

 

 

Three old photos – pre-Chasewater Heaths

Three old photos

pre-Chasewater Heaths

These photos came from Steve Organ’s Collection

Going round the bend (!) towards Chasewater Heaths.  Looks like Arthur Edwards in Hi-Viz, don’t know the other chap – sorry.

A shot of the pld Brownhills West station with, I believe, Kim Wilkins.

P.Way gang with DL7, I think.  There are two chaps who I don’t know, those I do know are Arthur Edwards, David Bathurst, the 2 don’t knows, then Dave Pearson, Les Emery and, at the front, a young helper, Jim Bates and Andy Clegg – not forgetting Beckie.

Railway Preservation Society (WM Div), later Chasewater Railway, Rolling Stock at Cannock & Rugeley Colliery

Railway Preservation Society (West Midlands Division), later

Chasewater Railway, Rolling Stock at Cannock & Rugeley Colliery

This photo was given to the Museum by Rob Cadman

RPS, Chasewater Railway, Rolling Stock at Cannock & Rugeley Colliery – Photo – Our thanks to Rob Cadman

A very interesting photograph from c May 1970, Railway Preservation Society (West Midlands Division), later Chasewater Light Railway, prior to removal from its original home in Hednesford to its new home at Chasewater.

During the spring and summer of 1970 the stock was moved to the yard of Cannock Wood colliery by NCB locos for ease of loading for the final move by road to Chasewater.  The two bogie coaches were moved by Wrekin Roadways at no cost to the Society.  Other items were delivered to Chasewater by the NCB, the only charge being for the move of loco ‘Cannock Wood’.

The vehicles in the photo are: a 7-plank coal wagon, the E1 loco ‘Cannock Wood’ (now on the Isle of Wight), the Midland Railway Royal Saloon, built 1910.  This was loaned to Derby Corporation for the embryonic Midland Railway Project.  It was later exchanged for the ex-Walsall Gas Works Sentinel, some equipment and cash.  This vehicle is now at the Midland Railway – Butterley.  The other steam loco is ‘Hem Heath No.1’, a Bagnall 0-6-0ST 3077 of 1955, ex Silverdale, which actually worked at Cannock Wood.  Between the left-hand window of Cannock Wood and the edge of the photo our Cadbury Van can be seen in the distance.

More Photographs from Steve Organ’s Collection.

More Photographs from Steve Organ’s Collection.

We have received a number of photographs from Steve’s collection and are sorting out those which will be added to our collection.  There are also photos on other subjects which we may well post over time.

Click on a pic for a larger version and use the side arrows to move on.

 

 

Photographs from Steve Organ’s Collection.

Photographs from Steve Organ’s Collection.

We have received a number of photographs from Steve’s collection and are sorting out those which will be added to our collection.  There are also photos on other subjects which we may well post over time.

Click on a pic for a larger version and use the side arrows to move on.

 

 

Chasewater Railway Museum Catalogue – Old Chasewater Railway Photos

Chasewater Railway Museum Catalogue

Old Chasewater Railway Photos

The XL list shows all the photos in Box File 10149.  The collection has been with the Museum for some time, many taken by Steve Organ.  There are a lot of very similar photos so we have tried to sort out the ones which are not duplicated.  The first selection shows ‘Sans Pareil’ which visited Chasewater on a couple of occasions in the early 2000s.

Click on the link below to see the full list

All photographs in Box 10149- XL Files 14-4-2018

Caption text – Object No., Description, Location.

Click on a pic for a larger version and use the side arrows to move on.

 

Some photos from Chasewater Railway – and one of New Street Station!

Some photos from Chasewater Railway – and one of Birmingham New Street Station!

These photos of Chasewater Railway were found by Godfrey amongst a collection given to the museum.  They show Sentinel, hopefully back in steam next year, DL7 and an old DMU, all towards the Chasewater Heaths end of the line.

 

6855

Birmingham New Street Station

It’s a bit different nowadays!!

What is interesting , for people of a certain age, is the poster for the Hippodrome Theatre – top of the bill – Billy Cotton and his Band – used to be regulars on the BBC Light Programme on the wireless!

Our thanks to Graham for the phot0.

Chasewater Railway Museum – New-to-us local photographs

Chasewater Railway Museum

New-to-us local photographs

We have received a few photographs which we have not seen before.

cannock-station

Cannock Station

2-brownhills-station-1967

Brownhills LMS (LNWR) Station, High Street.  1967

4-walsall-wood-station

Walsall Wood Station, just one platform left.

6-walsall-wood-line-towards-canal

The Midland Railway line from Walsall Wood heading towards Chasewater.  The track had been lifted on the left, where it headed for the canal.  The bridge had been removed.  The line on the right went into Walsall Wood Colliery (The Coppy Pit).

5-walsall-wood-cottage

This photograph is most interesting.  I think your original thoughts were that it was taken north of the Walsall Wood Colliery photo.  If so, where?  It is true that the landscape is similar to that found in that location but if the photo was taken looking north as the telegraph poles and the sun’s lighting would seems to suggest then where would the overbridge from which the photo is taken be located?  There are also a couple of other issues – the slag heap on the left and the electricity cable crossing the photo from left to right in the mid-distance.

I think that the house is actually called “Bridge Cottage, 1900”.  The date is a guess, but I believe the cottage was built around 1888 – 1902, i.e.:-  after the railway.  The bushes/scrub on the right hides Long Lane. The slag heap is that of Leacroft Colliery  and the electricity cable is clearly shown on post-war maps running between Churchbridge Sub-station and Drakelow Power Station. The photographer was standing on Chapel Street Bridge in Norton Canes, looking north towards Littleworth Junction.  Again a 1966-67 date is not unrealistic as the line remained in-situ at that time.  The lane on the left is not a canal, the Wyrley and Essington Canal Extension branch being almost immediately to the left of the photographer.  As usual, I will stand to be corrected but the above seems to firmly locate the photo to this site.  The electricity cable is by far the biggest clue. – Ian Pell

3-norton-conduit-junction-signal-box

This photo is definitely of Norton Crossing, Norton Canes.  We are looking south towards Conduit Junction at the Hednesford – Walsall road.  In later years the crossing was manned by Bernard Hurmson and his wife Bettie.  Clearly, the photograph was taken after closure.  The signal arm on the down line is for the original end of the branch at Norton Green, as per the attached signalling diagram from the John Swift Collection of signal box diagrams of the 1950’s.  Ian Pell

Comment from Colin Noble:  Bernard Hurmson was my stepfather, and as you refer, was the sole signalman at the Signalbox on Walsall Rd, Norton Canes, up to the closure of the line. His wife, Bessie, not Betty, was actually one of the Village Post Ladies, not working for the Railway!

norton-crossing-diagram-ian-pell

bettie-norton-crossing-ian-pell

As can be seen form the photo of Bessie at the crossing, the gates are the same in construction as per your photograph, and the box is the same, hence the conclusion that your photograph is of Norton Crossing, probably on around 1966-67?  Ian Pell

ryders-hayes-crossing-ian-pell

The above photograph, taken in 1974 shows the crossing keeper’s cottage and Ryder’s Hayes Level Crossing with the traditional crossing gates in place.  The following year these were replaced by rural barrier gates and the crossing keeper was removed and the buildings demolished.  The view is looking south towards Railswood and Pelsall Station.  From 1856-58 a station existed to the immediate south of the keeper’s building.  Ryders Hayes signal box which was situated behind the photographer on the up side was an early LN&W box.  It pre-dated Norton Junction No.1 box, but was retained even after the Norton Junction box was replaced by Norton Junction No.1 box in 1889.  It closed as late as the 1950’s.  Initially, it controlled Bloomer’s Sidings which were in place to serve the Pelsall Coal and Iron Company’s branch (1865) even before the Norton Branch (1858) and sidings (begun in 1889).  Ian Pell

ryders-hayes-crossing-map-ian-pell

This 1884 maps clearly shows the two boxes – Ryders Hays Crossing box and Norton Junction box. The later is in its original location on the down side of the line.  It also illustrates the lack of sidings to the north of the junction on the Norton Branch.  The sidings shown were often called “Bloomer’s sidings”, a reference to the owner of the PC & I Company and were constructed, together with a further line (extended loop) onto the branch in 1875 (mt6/147/17).  In 1875 the sidings consisted of 4 sidings on the down side and 1 siding on the up side.  At this time (18th Nov 1875) the junction was upgraded and additions points and signalling were added.  The beginning of Norton Junction sidings as we knew them started in earnest in 1889 when the new Norton Junction No.1 box was also added.  The sidings were initially controlled by Ryders Haye’s box, with Norton Junction box controlling the junction with the Norton branch and the two down sidings which extended parallel to the down line towards Brownhills.  Prior to the 1889 works , the Walsall Wood Colliery branch had been added, together with an additional up siding in October 1882 and the footbridge north of Ryder’s Hayes box had been approved for construction in December 1884.

By April 1884, the WTT indicated that Target No.74 shunted the Walsall Wood and the PC&I sidings, and that Target No. 78 “cleared out” all traffic from the above mentioned sidings.  On weekdays there were 2 regular and 3 conditional freight workings on the Norton Branch, working to and from Norton Junction,  These were:-                                                                                                                                1 Norton Junction to Harrison’s Sdg.                                                                              1 Norton Junction to Conduit Colliery                                                                             No. 80 – Norton Junction to Conduit Colliery as required.

Ryder’s Hayes signal box, which had a Tumbler frame, closed on 1st September 1954 when Norton Junction No.1 took control of the sidings and crossing (mt29/100/26). 

Ian Pell

Our thanks to Peter Stamper for the first six photos, and to Ian Pell for the others and for his always worth-while comments.

 

 

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