Category Archives: Photograph Collection

Chasewater Railway Museum Catalogue – Old Chasewater Railway Photos

Chasewater Railway Museum Catalogue

Old Chasewater Railway Photos

The XL list shows all the photos in Box File 10149.  The collection has been with the Museum for some time, many taken by Steve Organ.  There are a lot of very similar photos so we have tried to sort out the ones which are not duplicated.  The first selection shows ‘Sans Pareil’ which visited Chasewater on a couple of occasions in the early 2000s.

All photographs in Box 10149- XL Files

Caption text – Object No., Description, Location.

Click on a pic for a larger version and use the side arrows to move on.

 

Some photos from Chasewater Railway – and one of New Street Station!

Some photos from Chasewater Railway – and one of Birmingham New Street Station!

These photos of Chasewater Railway were found by Godfrey amongst a collection given to the museum.  They show Sentinel, hopefully back in steam next year, DL7 and an old DMU, all towards the Chasewater Heaths end of the line.

 

6855

Birmingham New Street Station

It’s a bit different nowadays!!

What is interesting , for people of a certain age, is the poster for the Hippodrome Theatre – top of the bill – Billy Cotton and his Band – used to be regulars on the BBC Light Programme on the wireless!

Our thanks to Graham for the phot0.

Chasewater Railway Museum – New-to-us local photographs

Chasewater Railway Museum

New-to-us local photographs

We have received a few photographs which we have not seen before.

cannock-station

Cannock Station

2-brownhills-station-1967

Brownhills LMS (LNWR) Station, High Street.  1967

4-walsall-wood-station

Walsall Wood Station, just one platform left.

6-walsall-wood-line-towards-canal

The Midland Railway line from Walsall Wood heading towards Chasewater.  The track had been lifted on the left, where it headed for the canal.  The bridge had been removed.  The line on the right went into Walsall Wood Colliery (The Coppy Pit).

5-walsall-wood-cottage

This photograph is most interesting.  I think your original thoughts were that it was taken north of the Walsall Wood Colliery photo.  If so, where?  It is true that the landscape is similar to that found in that location but if the photo was taken looking north as the telegraph poles and the sun’s lighting would seems to suggest then where would the overbridge from which the photo is taken be located?  There are also a couple of other issues – the slag heap on the left and the electricity cable crossing the photo from left to right in the mid-distance.

I think that the house is actually called “Bridge Cottage, 1900”.  The date is a guess, but I believe the cottage was built around 1888 – 1902, i.e.:-  after the railway.  The bushes/scrub on the right hides Long Lane. The slag heap is that of Leacroft Colliery  and the electricity cable is clearly shown on post-war maps running between Churchbridge Sub-station and Drakelow Power Station. The photographer was standing on Chapel Street Bridge in Norton Canes, looking north towards Littleworth Junction.  Again a 1966-67 date is not unrealistic as the line remained in-situ at that time.  The lane on the left is not a canal, the Wyrley and Essington Canal Extension branch being almost immediately to the left of the photographer.  As usual, I will stand to be corrected but the above seems to firmly locate the photo to this site.  The electricity cable is by far the biggest clue. – Ian Pell

3-norton-conduit-junction-signal-box

This photo is definitely of Norton Crossing, Norton Canes.  We are looking south towards Conduit Junction at the Hednesford – Walsall road.  In later years the crossing was manned by Bernard Hurmson and his wife Bettie.  Clearly, the photograph was taken after closure.  The signal arm on the down line is for the original end of the branch at Norton Green, as per the attached signalling diagram from the John Swift Collection of signal box diagrams of the 1950’s.  Ian Pell

Comment from Colin Noble:  Bernard Hurmson was my stepfather, and as you refer, was the sole signalman at the Signalbox on Walsall Rd, Norton Canes, up to the closure of the line. His wife, Bessie, not Betty, was actually one of the Village Post Ladies, not working for the Railway!

norton-crossing-diagram-ian-pell

bettie-norton-crossing-ian-pell

As can be seen form the photo of Bessie at the crossing, the gates are the same in construction as per your photograph, and the box is the same, hence the conclusion that your photograph is of Norton Crossing, probably on around 1966-67?  Ian Pell

ryders-hayes-crossing-ian-pell

The above photograph, taken in 1974 shows the crossing keeper’s cottage and Ryder’s Hayes Level Crossing with the traditional crossing gates in place.  The following year these were replaced by rural barrier gates and the crossing keeper was removed and the buildings demolished.  The view is looking south towards Railswood and Pelsall Station.  From 1856-58 a station existed to the immediate south of the keeper’s building.  Ryders Hayes signal box which was situated behind the photographer on the up side was an early LN&W box.  It pre-dated Norton Junction No.1 box, but was retained even after the Norton Junction box was replaced by Norton Junction No.1 box in 1889.  It closed as late as the 1950’s.  Initially, it controlled Bloomer’s Sidings which were in place to serve the Pelsall Coal and Iron Company’s branch (1865) even before the Norton Branch (1858) and sidings (begun in 1889).  Ian Pell

ryders-hayes-crossing-map-ian-pell

This 1884 maps clearly shows the two boxes – Ryders Hays Crossing box and Norton Junction box. The later is in its original location on the down side of the line.  It also illustrates the lack of sidings to the north of the junction on the Norton Branch.  The sidings shown were often called “Bloomer’s sidings”, a reference to the owner of the PC & I Company and were constructed, together with a further line (extended loop) onto the branch in 1875 (mt6/147/17).  In 1875 the sidings consisted of 4 sidings on the down side and 1 siding on the up side.  At this time (18th Nov 1875) the junction was upgraded and additions points and signalling were added.  The beginning of Norton Junction sidings as we knew them started in earnest in 1889 when the new Norton Junction No.1 box was also added.  The sidings were initially controlled by Ryders Haye’s box, with Norton Junction box controlling the junction with the Norton branch and the two down sidings which extended parallel to the down line towards Brownhills.  Prior to the 1889 works , the Walsall Wood Colliery branch had been added, together with an additional up siding in October 1882 and the footbridge north of Ryder’s Hayes box had been approved for construction in December 1884.

By April 1884, the WTT indicated that Target No.74 shunted the Walsall Wood and the PC&I sidings, and that Target No. 78 “cleared out” all traffic from the above mentioned sidings.  On weekdays there were 2 regular and 3 conditional freight workings on the Norton Branch, working to and from Norton Junction,  These were:-                                                                                                                                1 Norton Junction to Harrison’s Sdg.                                                                              1 Norton Junction to Conduit Colliery                                                                             No. 80 – Norton Junction to Conduit Colliery as required.

Ryder’s Hayes signal box, which had a Tumbler frame, closed on 1st September 1954 when Norton Junction No.1 took control of the sidings and crossing (mt29/100/26). 

Ian Pell

Our thanks to Peter Stamper for the first six photos, and to Ian Pell for the others and for his always worth-while comments.

 

 

Save

Chasewater Railway Museum – 2 new photographs

Chasewater Railway Museum

2 new photographs

Brereton Sidinngs Signal Box

Brereton Sidinngs Signal Box

The first photo is another photo of Brereton Sidings signal box.

Edward Dorricott paid £2.50 for the photo and gave it straight to Barry Bull.

Edward Dorricott is the author of te recently published book on Duttons Signal Works, Worcester, in which Chasewater Railway Museum gets more than one mention.

boat

This second photo has a couple of question marks hanging over it, which I hope we may get answers to.

‘Captain Midnight’ is a former naval officer named Glover, but we are not sure of his rank – possibly Lieutenant Commander or Commander.

Thank you Pete Styche for the following information:  GLOVER Gerald (Lt. Commander R. N. Rtd.) Passed away 12th October 2014 aged 76 years.

He was an occasional benefactor of the Railway, whenever he paid a visit there was always a donation in the box and maybe some good magazines donated.

The next question is who is his friend?

And finally, where was the photo taken?

Save

An old Chasewater Railway Photograph From the Industrial Railway Society’s September 2016 Magazine

An old Chasewater Railway Photograph

From the Industrial Railway Society’s September 2016 Magazine

 

The IRS’s AGM took place on Saturday 16th April 2016 at Chasewater Railway.

It was enjoyed by IRS members and the members of the Railway who were involved in running special trains for the Society.

20&21This photograph was taken by Cliff Shepherd at the IRS AGM weekend in April 1972.

On the Sunday, visits were made to Chasewater and members travelled in the Maryport and Carlisle carriage of 1875 vintage and the Great Western Brake Van, which now, in 2016, is restored to its former glory.

The locomotives involved topping and tailing were two former Worthington Brewery Planet locomotives, nos. 20 and 21, on what was then a very basic railway.

Holly Bank IRS

Holly Bank No.3 (Hunslet 3783-1953) runs around after the first of the IRS trains at Chasetown Church Street Station on 16-4-2016.

Chasewater Railway Museum – Photos from 2006

Chasewater Railway Museum 

Photos from 2006

A few more photographs, taken by Robin Stewart-Smith, on the 28-4-2006, of a  J94 Austerity locomotive No.68009 on works train.

6842Our

Our thanks to Robin for sending us these excellent photographs, taken at Chasewater Railway, on the causeway and at Chasewater Heaths Station.

Chasewater Railway Museum – A Visiting Peckett, 2006

Chasewater Railway Museum 

A Visiting Peckett, 2006

No

Peckett 0-4-0ST 1738/1928

Supplied new to Birmingham Electricity Authority, Hams Hall Power Station, near Coleshill.

By 1968 the loco was disposed of by sale to a Severn Valley Railway member and the loco went to Bridgnorth on the embryonic Severn Valley Railway.

The locomotive saw very little use and was eventually sold privately, this time going to the South Devon Railway.

Later again resold, this time going to Titley Junction, Herefordshire. The loco masquerades as the Thomas the Tank Engine character ‘Percy’ and has visited several preserved railways at Thomas events.

Martin Evans Pic

Chasewater Railway Museum – And another visiting loco

Chasewater Railway Museum

And another visiting loco – Including video

2009_06200016

Wimblebury

A Hunslet 0-6-0ST Austerity class, 3839/1956

Built by Hunslet of Leeds, Wimblebury was delivered new to the National Coal Board at Cannock Wood Colliery near Hednesford in Staffordshire, and worked there until withdrawn in the early 1970s. Originally earmarked for spares for another engine, Wimblebury was purchased privately for preservation and moved to the Foxfield Railway in Staffordshire on 26th September 1973.

This, in 2009, is the second visit to Chasewater by this popular engine in recent years.

05164 Wimblebury 0-6-0ST Hunslett 3839-1956 CRC Taken Hazel Slade

Passing over Hazel Slade level crossing.

Train

 

 

Chasewater Railway Museum – ‘Things that got away!’

Chasewater Railway Museum

Things that got away!

From time to time various people advise us of the latest offerings on ebay, mostly these are of little interest and on occasions of dubious authenticity, for example, the Hawthorn Leslie worksplate 2780 of 1909. Very odd this one as our loco ‘Asbestos’, resident at Chasewater since 1968, came with worksplates affixed, which are still retained on the loco.

Littleton Wagon Plate
However, we were alerted recently to an enamel wagon plate – ‘When empty return to Littleton Collieries Sidings Penkridge. LM&S Rly’. This would have been a nice addition to our collection of local artefacts, but, despite the best efforts of Rob Cadman, acting on our behalf, we were unlucky with a bidder being found at £150 but prepared to go much higher.
Following this disappointment we then heard of a member who spotted a rather nice Midland Railway, Walsall Wood to Walsall third class return ticket available on ebay. Tickets to or from Walsall Wood and Brownhills (Midland) are pretty scarce and this example realised £102, which I suspect rather surprised our man who had expressed interest in it on our behalf.

Our thanks go to Rob Cadman, Simon Swain and Kevin Pettifor for trying their best for the museum.

Walsall Wood opened 1st July 1884 and closed 31st March 1930, along with Brownhills (Midland), the latter having been renamed Brownhills Watling Street 2nd June 1924. So two items which we would have liked ‘got away’ – but we have photos.

Walsall to Walsall Wood ticket

Chasewater Railway Museum – 3 photos of Hawthorn Leslie loco ‘Asbestos’ (Not forgetting ‘Sentinel’)

Chasewater Railway Museum

3 photos of Hawthorn Leslie loco ‘Asbestos’ (Not forgetting ‘Sentinel’)

A few photographs sent to us by Robin Stewart-Smith, taken at a Gala in 2004.  (Hard to believe that it’s 12 years ago).

The first two are of ‘Asbestos’ pulling into Chasetown Church Street, and the third was taken at Brownhills West, ‘Asbestos’ and Sentinel’.  Both locos on freight duties.

Asbestos 1

Asbestos 2

Sentinel & Asbo

‘Asbestos’  Hawthorn Leslie 0-4-0 ST 2780-1909

‘Sentinel’  4wVBT  9632-1957