Tag Archives: Museum Collection

Chasewater Railway Museum – A new item from North of the Border

Chasewater Railway Museum 

A new item from North of the Border

A signal lever collar from the Glasgow and South Western Railway, cast iron with a brass label, reading  ‘Train Waiting’  (Sorry, not very clear in photo.)

The Glasgow & South Western Railway was a self-contained system in south-western Scotland with a total of around 325 miles of track. Its terminus was at Glasgow St. Enoch and from here in connection with the Midland railway expresses ran to London St Pancras via Carlisle, in competition with the West Coast Main Line. The G&SWR also served the important towns of Paisley, Ayr, Kilmarnock, and Dumfries. The locomotive works was at Kilmarnock but was allowed to become very run down and locomotive production ceased after the First World War. Boat trains connected with the company’s steamers at Greenock, Portpatrick and Stranraer. The G&SWR achieved surprisingly high speeds on its passenger expresses, and was remarkably innovative in its locomotive design.

The 1923 Grouping was a horrendous blow to the G&SWR, who found themselves in a subsidiary role to their arch-rival the Caledonian Railway. The MR and the G&SWR had tried to merge several times in the nineteenth century but had been told by the Government that this would be too much of a monopoly.(spellerweb.net)

A hardware example of Railwayana from a company not well represented in the Museum.

These three items are all that we have, apart from the signal collar.

Another new addition to the collection – Coat of Arms, Maryort & Carlisle Railway

Another new addition to the collection,

Coat of Arms of the

Maryport & Carlisle Railway

Chasewater Railway has a 6-wheeled coach which belonged to the Maryport and Carlisle Railway, before being used as part of the Paddy Train at Cannock and Rugeley Colliery Pit at Cannock Wood.  The Coat of Arms is a long sought-after object for the Museum.

There were 27 subsidiary companies in the group of railways which made up the LMS, but only a handful of them owned locomotives and rolling stock.

The oldest was the Maryport & Carlisle, which was incorporated as long ago as 1837.  It was opened in instalments and completed throughout on 10th February 1845, eventually owning nearly 43 route miles of line.  It enjoyed an enviable dividend record, which rose to a peak of 13% in 1873, and it was one of the most prosperous of all British railways over a long period of years.  It contributed 33 locomotives, 71 coaching vehicles and 1,404 freight vehicles to the LMS.

Two early types of transfer for the decoration of the coaching stock, which was given a varnished teak external finish at the time, have been traced.  One was a conventional script monogram.  The other consisted of the initials ‘MCR’ on a red field surrounded by an Oxford blue garter with the usual gilt edging, ornamentation and legend bearing the full title.   It measures 9¼ in wide X 11¼ in high over black shading.

A livery of green with white upper panels was adopted in 1905 for the passenger train vehicles, which blended pleasantly with the green of the locomotives.  Five years later Tearnes produced for display on both an armorial device which shared with that of the Central London the distinction of embodying neither name nor motto.

The transfer measures 10¼in wide X 16¾in high and is simple and appropriate.  On an ornamental shield Maryport (top left) and Carlisle (bottom right) are quartered with the arms of J.P. Senhouse of Netherall (top right), represented by the popinjay, and those of Sir Wilfred Lawson (bottom left).  Senhouse and Lawson were the first and fourth chairmen the company had during its eighty-five years of life.

Uniform buttons carried the same device.

Chasewater Railway Museum – August Newsletter

Chasewater Railway Museum

August Newsletter

Coming very soon – Burton Brewery Locomotives Day – Sunday July 15th 2018

Coming very soon –

Burton Brewery Locomotives Day

Another Glenalmond Photograph

Chasewater Railway Museum 

Shelton No.4 of 1912 0-4-0ST OC ‘Glenalmond’

Brand new and posed here for its ‘Official’ photograph at Shelton Steelworks, Stoke-on-Trent.  From the Basil Jeuda Collection  IRS.  Supplied by Godfrey Hucker, Chasewater Raiway Museum.

A recent invitation to Shugborough Hall to view various Staffordshire Museum Services items in store has resulted in several items finding their way to Chasewater, either on loan or as outright gifts.

From a locomotive enthusiast point of view, the star would be the nameplate ‘Glenalmond’.  The locomotive was an 0-4-0ST with 14”x 22” outside cylinders and 3’ 5” wheels.

One of just four locos steam built by and for service at Shelton Iron & Steel Co., Stoke-on-Trent and new in 1912.  The name is taken from the Scottish seat of Lord Faringdon, a Managing Director of the Company.

Lord Faringdon was a one-time Chairman of the Great Central Railway who also named one of their 4-6-0s ’Glenalmond’.

The Shelton ‘Glenalmond’ affectionately known as ‘Gleny’ was built to an Andrew Barclay design with a boiler supplied by Bagnalls Castle Engine Works, Stafford.

The loco lasted in service almost 60 years, being unused from early 1970 and sadly cut up in 1972.

Our thanks go to Chris Copp, Chasewater Railway Museum’s Mentor, for arranging the loan of the nameplate.    (Compiled by Barry Bull)

Photograph courtesy of Pete Stamper.

Chasewater Railway Museum – Newsletter, May 2018

Chasewater Railway Museum

Newsletter, May 2018

May 2018

Chasewater Railway Museum Catalogue, Commercial Records & Equipment

Chasewater Railway Museum Catalogue

Commercial Records & Equipment

Click on the link below to see the full list

All Commercial Records & Equipment 21-3-2018

Caption text: Object number, name, description, creator, location.

Click on picture for a larger version.

More Photographs from Steve Organ’s Collection.

More Photographs from Steve Organ’s Collection.

We have received a number of photographs from Steve’s collection and are sorting out those which will be added to our collection.  There are also photos on other subjects which we may well post over time.

Click on a pic for a larger version and use the side arrows to move on.

 

 

A New Year – New Items in the Museum

Chasewater Railway Museum

New Year – New Items

Three very nice items in the museum to start the New Year. 

They are the cabside numbers from nos. 1, 5 and 8 from local colliery locos.

Number 1 is from the Cannock & Rugeley loco – ‘Marquis’

The name originates from the first Marquis of Anglesey, a title awarded to the Earl of Uxbridge who fought along side Wellington at the Battle of Waterloo. Carried by the Lilleshall Company built 0-6-0 saddle tank new to the Cannock and Rugeley Collieries as their first loco in 1867, she or is it he lasted until cut up at the NCB Cannock Central Workshops during May 1964.

 

No.5 is from Cannock & Rugeley loco  ‘Beaudesert’

Beaudesert from the little 0-6-0 saddle tank built by Fox Walker, works number 266 of 1875 supplied new to Cannock and Rugeley Collieries as their number 5. Beaudesert was the ancestral home of the Paget family who became Earls of Uxbridge before being given the title and Estate Marquis of Anglesey. Finally cut up in 1964 the other nameplate of the loco survives and is on display in Kidderminster Railway Museum.

No.8 is from Cannock & Rugeley loco ‘Harrison’

No.8 Harrison 0-6-0 T  Built by the Yorkshire Engine Company, 186/1872 as a 2-4-0 T, rebuilt to 0-6-0T 1916.  Bought from B.P.Blockley of Bloxwich in 1905.  It had originally been Potteries, Shrewsbury and North Wales Railway ‘Hope’ and later No.1 on the East and West Junction Railway.  Sold to Stanton Ironworks, Stanton, Notts., 1950.  Since scrapped.

Chasewater Railway Museum – January 2018 Newsletter

Chasewater Railway Museum 

January 2018 Newsletter