Tag Archives: Museum Collection

Chasewater Railway Museum – An 1857 Book

Chasewater Railway Museum 

A Book dated 1857

A book has been donated to the Museum, described as a ‘Treatise on Cast and Wrought Iron Bridges & Girders as applied to Railway structures.’

Compiled by William Humber in 1857.

It is a substantial book, measuring 15″x 11″ and was donated by Chris Browy of Norton Canes.

Amongst numerous descriptions of works are two local bridges:

No.1:

South Staffordshire Railway

Aqueduct Cannock Chase

Messrs. McClean and Stileman, C.E. ( Consulting Engineers – John Robinson McClean and Francis Cloughton Stileman)  John Robinson McClean was involved with the South Staffordshire Railway and the Cannock Chase Colliery Company, and is of particular interest to Chasewater Railway and the Museum.

In 1849 he took into partnership Mr. F. C. Stileman, with whom he engaged in the construction of the South Staffordshire Railway, the Birmingham Wolverhampton and Dudley Railway, the Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal reservoirs, and the South Staffordshire Water Works supplying water from Lichfield to a very extensive district.

Constructed by Messrs. Lloyds, Forsters & Co.

This Aqueduct was erected to carry the Walsall and Birmingham Canal over the Bloxwich Branch of the South Staffordshire Railway.  The work had to be completed before proceeding with the railway cutting to prevent interruption with the canal traffic, and also the supply to a water wheel, situated some distance below the ground of operations, in which the canal company was interested.  Considerable difficulty was experienced in carrying out the work, because of the unfavourable nature of the soil, which was loose, sandy and, to some extent, marshy; increased by the continual sinking of the banks, caused by the coal and iron pits, which undermine the whole district.

The aqueduct is carried at right angles across the railway in two spans, each 14 feet wide, by 15 feet 4 inches from the level of the rails to the bottom of the girders.  The trough 20 feet 4 inches wide by 5 feet 6 inches deep.

No.2:

South Staffordshire Railway

Cannock Branch

Messrs. J.McClean and Stileman C.E.

This bridge was erected for the purpose of carrying the Cannock Branch of the South Staffordshire Railway over the Wednesfield Branch of the Birmingham Canal. The peculiarity of this case consists in a better distribution of the metal in the top flange of the girders by which means the liability of that member to buckle when subjected to severe strains is in a great measure obviated.

The railway crosses the canal at a very acute angle, and to obviate as much as possible the effects of unequal deflection, each line of rail is supported by independent platforms so as to form two distinct bridges.  The longitudinal or main girders are 63 feet 4 inches long, having a bearing of 6 feet at each end on the abutment, so that the span is only 51 feet 4 inches.

 

Railway Memorabilia Display

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Aldridge Library situated in Rookery Lane Aldridge, is currently displaying an exhibition of Railway Memorabilia courtesy of Chasewater Railway Museum. The display is housed in two glass cabinets.

To compliment the cabinet display is a screen presentation of the aspects of Chasewater Railway.

The display which was organised by Susan Satterthwaite (a volunteer at Chasewater Railway) will run until the end of May. The Library is open from Tuesdays until Saturdays, (closed Mondays & Sundays).

The artifacts displayed are just a selection of the many on display in the free to enter,  Chasewater Railway Museum, which is situated at Brownhills West Station, and is open on train running days.

Why not visit and relive the past.

Chasewater Railway Museum – Colourful Wagon Plate

Chasewater Railway Museum

Colourful Wagon Plate

A new addition to the museum collection is this large – 14.75″x 9.75″ – wagon plate.

Manufactured by the Birmingham Wagon Company Ltd.

Chasewater Railway Museum – Another Local Item

Chasewater Railway Museum

Another Local Item

A Single-Line Staff. 

A wooden staff with chain attached and three quite worn brass plates:

Holly Bank Colliery

Lewis Tileries

And Essington Wood

Essington Wood was the signal box controlling the Holly Bank Branch.  This information came from Frank Allen’s book :

“The Cannock Line – Fourteen Miles of History”

The staff was donated by Barry Bull.

 

Chasewater Railway Museum – Opening for 2019 this coming Sunday, March 10th

Chasewater Railway Museum 

Opening for 2019 this coming Sunday,

March 10th

It’s been a while coming with a great deal of maintenance going on but on this Sunday, March 10th, a diesel service is scheduled and the Museum will be open.

Chasewater Railway Museum – March 2019 Newsletter

Chasewater Railway Museum

March 2019 Newsletter

2 pages!

Chasewater Railway Museum – Photo of Walsall Wood Station

Chasewater Railway Museum

Photo of Walsall Wood Station

Tha latest photograph that we have come across of Walsall Wood Station.

Not sure of the date but it was before 1964 as the Walsall Wood Colliery was still working, as can be seen by the smoking chimney in the background. This closed in that year.

The line contiued through Clayhanger to Brownhills West and into the Cannock Chase Coalfield – via, these days, Chasewater Railway.

Chasewater Railway Museum – A new item from North of the Border

Chasewater Railway Museum 

A new item from North of the Border

A signal lever collar from the Glasgow and South Western Railway, cast iron with a brass label, reading  ‘Train Waiting’  (Sorry, not very clear in photo.)

The Glasgow & South Western Railway was a self-contained system in south-western Scotland with a total of around 325 miles of track. Its terminus was at Glasgow St. Enoch and from here in connection with the Midland railway expresses ran to London St Pancras via Carlisle, in competition with the West Coast Main Line. The G&SWR also served the important towns of Paisley, Ayr, Kilmarnock, and Dumfries. The locomotive works was at Kilmarnock but was allowed to become very run down and locomotive production ceased after the First World War. Boat trains connected with the company’s steamers at Greenock, Portpatrick and Stranraer. The G&SWR achieved surprisingly high speeds on its passenger expresses, and was remarkably innovative in its locomotive design.

The 1923 Grouping was a horrendous blow to the G&SWR, who found themselves in a subsidiary role to their arch-rival the Caledonian Railway. The MR and the G&SWR had tried to merge several times in the nineteenth century but had been told by the Government that this would be too much of a monopoly.(spellerweb.net)

A hardware example of Railwayana from a company not well represented in the Museum.

These three items are all that we have, apart from the signal collar.

Another new addition to the collection – Coat of Arms, Maryort & Carlisle Railway

Another new addition to the collection,

Coat of Arms of the

Maryport & Carlisle Railway

Chasewater Railway has a 6-wheeled coach which belonged to the Maryport and Carlisle Railway, before being used as part of the Paddy Train at Cannock and Rugeley Colliery Pit at Cannock Wood.  The Coat of Arms is a long sought-after object for the Museum.

There were 27 subsidiary companies in the group of railways which made up the LMS, but only a handful of them owned locomotives and rolling stock.

The oldest was the Maryport & Carlisle, which was incorporated as long ago as 1837.  It was opened in instalments and completed throughout on 10th February 1845, eventually owning nearly 43 route miles of line.  It enjoyed an enviable dividend record, which rose to a peak of 13% in 1873, and it was one of the most prosperous of all British railways over a long period of years.  It contributed 33 locomotives, 71 coaching vehicles and 1,404 freight vehicles to the LMS.

Two early types of transfer for the decoration of the coaching stock, which was given a varnished teak external finish at the time, have been traced.  One was a conventional script monogram.  The other consisted of the initials ‘MCR’ on a red field surrounded by an Oxford blue garter with the usual gilt edging, ornamentation and legend bearing the full title.   It measures 9¼ in wide X 11¼ in high over black shading.

A livery of green with white upper panels was adopted in 1905 for the passenger train vehicles, which blended pleasantly with the green of the locomotives.  Five years later Tearnes produced for display on both an armorial device which shared with that of the Central London the distinction of embodying neither name nor motto.

The transfer measures 10¼in wide X 16¾in high and is simple and appropriate.  On an ornamental shield Maryport (top left) and Carlisle (bottom right) are quartered with the arms of J.P. Senhouse of Netherall (top right), represented by the popinjay, and those of Sir Wilfred Lawson (bottom left).  Senhouse and Lawson were the first and fourth chairmen the company had during its eighty-five years of life.

Uniform buttons carried the same device.

Chasewater Railway Museum – August Newsletter

Chasewater Railway Museum

August Newsletter