Tag Archives: Steam Locomotives

Chasewater Railway Museum – Sans Pareil Black & White Photos

Chasewater Railway Museum

Sans Pareil Black & White Photos

While going through an old photograph album, David Bathurst came across some black and white photos of ‘Sans Pareil’ on one of her visits to Chasewater Railway, round about 2000 – 2002.

Click on a pic for a larger version and use the side arrows to move on.

Chasewater Railway Museum – A new item from North of the Border

Chasewater Railway Museum 

A new item from North of the Border

A signal lever collar from the Glasgow and South Western Railway, cast iron with a brass label, reading  ‘Train Waiting’  (Sorry, not very clear in photo.)

The Glasgow & South Western Railway was a self-contained system in south-western Scotland with a total of around 325 miles of track. Its terminus was at Glasgow St. Enoch and from here in connection with the Midland railway expresses ran to London St Pancras via Carlisle, in competition with the West Coast Main Line. The G&SWR also served the important towns of Paisley, Ayr, Kilmarnock, and Dumfries. The locomotive works was at Kilmarnock but was allowed to become very run down and locomotive production ceased after the First World War. Boat trains connected with the company’s steamers at Greenock, Portpatrick and Stranraer. The G&SWR achieved surprisingly high speeds on its passenger expresses, and was remarkably innovative in its locomotive design.

The 1923 Grouping was a horrendous blow to the G&SWR, who found themselves in a subsidiary role to their arch-rival the Caledonian Railway. The MR and the G&SWR had tried to merge several times in the nineteenth century but had been told by the Government that this would be too much of a monopoly.(spellerweb.net)

A hardware example of Railwayana from a company not well represented in the Museum.

These three items are all that we have, apart from the signal collar.

Chasewater Railway Museum Bits and Pieces No.9 More from the Early Days – From 1960 April RPS Newsletter Vol 1 No.4

More from the Early Days

From 1960 April RPS Newsletter Vol 1 No.4

West Midlands District

This picture shows the old headquarters in Hednesford.  The building which the carriages are partly inside is still standing, although it is bricked up now.  The white buildings on the other side of the line to Rugeley was the wagon works – long gone.

Public Meeting, Saturday, March 5th 1960

Mr. G. T. Cox,  WMD Chairman, opened the meeting at 3.00pm.  He expressed his regret that there were not more people present, and said that possibly the unusually fine weather had diverted persons to outdoor pursuits.

Mr. Cox went on to say, “Many of us often look back to the bygone days.  We younger ones can only remember the pre-nationalisation days, whilst older ones can remember quite clearly the pre-grouping companies and put down their memories in black and white.”

“The best way of showing any exhibition piece is in its natural surroundings, and this is what the RPS means by a ‘living’ museum.  You will not get one by asking, but you will if you support the RPS to the best of your ability.  There is little preserved in contrast to the vast scrapped during the last 50 years.  It is within our reach to extend the range, if action is taken now.”

The General Secretary, D. Noel Draycott, briefly described the origins of the RPS and the district organisation which gives local groups the chance to build p local collections.  The first programme for the WMD has been drawn up, covering the purchase of rolling stock and other large relics.  The programme is divided into three stages, but it is not necessarily the order in which items will be purchased.  The selection of relics depends on the speed with which our funds grow.

Mr. R. De Lacy-Spencer pointed out that many relics were kept by persons who did not realise their historic interest to railway enthusiasts.  An example of this was the Midland Railway stationmaster’s hat which had been presented to the RPS by a lady living in Lincolnshire.

The WMD Secretary, D. A. Ives, gave an account of progress in the area.  Membership was growing and a keen committee were considering more plans for the future.  Members were contributing many smaller relics, and a good selection was on view.  He had been corresponding with BR for some time about a possible depot site, but with no result to date.

Mr. F. J. Harvey read a branch line survey he had recently made.  It was an account of the present condition of the MR branch from Aldridge to Brownhills and Chasewater.  The civil engineering features appeared to be in good condition, but the permanent way was neglected towards the end of the branch and part had been lifted.  At present only a section of it was used for a daily freight trip.

The meeting was wound up at 4.30pm and Mr. A. Holden from the audience proposed a vote of thanks to the speakers which was carried.

Stop Press! – Depot established in WMD

We are pleased to announce that negotiations for the establishment of a depot have reached a definite stage.  The site is at Hednesford, about 11 miles from Wolverhampton, and contains 150 yards of siding, part of which is under cover.  Fuller details were given to members at the visit to the Stafford/Uttoxeter branch on Sunday, March 27th.  These details are not to hand at the time of writing this, and a description with information about working parties will appear in the next issue of the newsletter.

This will enable the WMD to launch an intensive campaign to purchase rolling-stock, etc., of the Cambrian, Great Western, London & North Western, Midland and North Staffordshire Railways.  All persons interested in these railways are invited to send donations direct to the West Midlands Treasurer, RPS.

Chasewater Railway Museum Bits and Pieces No.8. From the Railway Preservation Society Newsletter Vol 1, No 3

Chasewater Railway Museum Bits and Pieces No.8.

RPS Newsletter Vol 1 No.3

Early days of the Railway Preservation Society

(West Midlands Division)

( Later to become Chasewater Railway)

 

The General Secretary’s page discussed the setting up of a Carriage & Wagon Section, to include as much information, as detailed as possible, about vehicles which are still used as well as those no longer seen other than in photographs.

For Posterity

On looking forward to the continued expansion of the RPS over the next 50 years, I wish to express the view that it will be desirable to reproduce the trains of main and branch lines at different periods in the steam age.

Settle & Carlisle Railway

Assuming that it may be possible to acquire such secondary main lines as Settle – Carlisle, Exeter – Plymouth, Midland & South West Junction Railway, and Somerset & Dorset Joint Railway among others, in the event of them being closed by British Railways, which occurrence is not entirely without the bounds of possibility, the running of semi-fast and local services forming scenic excursions and conveying intermediate traffic would be possible.

The bridge carries Pine Road over the old S&D trackbed (closed 1966) to the east of the site of Corfe Mullen Halt (closed 1956). © Copyright David Spencer and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

In this connection the point to stress is the need to acquire a few of the older express types such as the ‘Sandringhams’, ‘King Arthurs’, ‘Patriots’ and ‘Schools’ which are threatened with extinction.  Whatever weight restrictions exist on original branch lines to be acquired let us at least endeavour to save a few more typically British express engines before it is too late.

This bridge crosses the dismantled Midland and South Western Junction Railway just west of Notgrove. It is now a Site of Special Scientific Interest because of the Jurassic limestones exposed here. © Copyright Tamara Kwan and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

It is also obvious that the efforts of various small preservation societies dedicated to the saving of one particular branch line would be better used within the united effort of the RPS as not all such branches could hope to survive by themselves.  The selection of branches in each area could then be carefully considered.

The point concerning all lines is that ‘period’ trains reproducing the locomotives, rolling stock and livery of, say, a Southern ‘Green Train’ or a 1930  ‘East Anglian Express’ could provide not only variety and colour in a standardised age, but would be in itself a strong appeal.

Of course this is assuming that the RPS becomes a railway company at some future date.  But why not?  Will someone design a suitable crest to super-impose on ‘period’ liveries?

Let us all contribute to making this a reality some day.

Platforms 5 and 4, for trains to and from upcountry, from the southern end. An Exmouth train is waiting at platform 1. © Copyright Derek Harper and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

West Midlands District

 

Inaugural Meeting

About 20 people met at the Station Hotel, Stafford, on Saturday 21st November for the inaugural meeting.  The General Secretary opened the meeting and sketched out the reasons leading to the formation of the RPS and future plans.  He explained that this was the first District to be inaugurated and though the general outline had been planned out, the detailed application of this would be the concern of the WMD committee.

Mr. D. A. Ives, who has been acting as Secretary, gave a report on progress to date.  He reported that membership was over 25 and that they had received a good response from individuals contacted.  The first step was to secure a small depot in a convenient locality, where relics could be stored and members work on their restoration.  The ideal site would contain a certain amount of covered accommodation as well as rail space for carriages and wagons.  He believed the support was there in the West Midlands, it was only a question of publicity and personal contact.

The committee to serve for the current year was then elected.

Future plans were discussed and the decision taken to launch a publicity campaign leading up to a public meeting in the New Year.  The site of the public meeting was fixed as being Birmingham, but emphasis was laid on arranging future meetings in different towns to give better contact with the public and members.

Three reporters attended the meeting, leading to reports in the ‘Stafford Newsletter’ and the ‘Staffordshire Weekly Sentinel’.

The public meeting was fixed for Saturday, March 5th in the Small Theatre at the Birmingham & Midland Institute, Paradise Street, Birmingham at 2.30pm.  Everyone welcome.

Chasewater Railway Museum – A New Local Addition

Chasewater Railway Museum

A New Local Addition

A worksplate from the locally built locomotive ‘Foggo’

Foggo, 1946, from a standard gauge 0-4-2ST built at the Chasetown workshops of the Cannock Chase Colliery Co.Ltd. in 1946, using parts supplied by Beyer Peacock, together with spare parts accumulated over the years from similar locomotives already at work at the colliery.  The name derives from Mr. Foggo, the General Manager of the company at the time and the nameplate incorporates the year of build.  It became National Coal Board property on 1st January, 1947.  Transferred to Coppice Colliery in early 1954 and to Brereton Colliery later the year.  Scrapped by W.H.Arnott Young in January 1961.  Cast Brass, 21½”x 8¾”, the front repainted.

5133 Photograph Foggo 0-4-2ST Built Chasetown 1946 – taken 2-8-1942 from spares and parts supplied by Beyer Peacock Album 1

The worksplate can be seen on the side of the engine.

Chasewater Railway Museum Bits and Pieces 2

Chasewater Railway Museum

Bits and Pieces 2

These posts are taken from old publications, newssheets and magazines produced by the Railway Preservation Society (West Midlands Division). Chasewater Light Railway Society and Chasewater Light Railway and Museum.

Another couple of bits and pieces from the Railway Forum – Winter 1965.  The first is a display of name and number plates, loaned by one of the members, and laid out in the Royal Saloon – which left Hednesford  in  1970 for the British Railways carriage works at Derby for restoration and then on to the Midland Railway Centre at Butterley.

Midlands RPS Open Day display

An interesting display of locomotive nameplates and numbers was arranged in the Royal Saloon for inspection by visitors at the Midlands R.P.S. Open Day.

New locomotives preserved in Midlands

Members of the Midlands area, R.P.S. expect to take delivery of another locomotive later this year which has been acquired through the generosity of one of their members, Dr. P.G. Plummer, who has offered to purchase it for them.

The locomotive is a Hudswell-Clarke 0-6-0ST built for the Sheepbridge Coal and Iron Company in 1895 (Works No. 431).  It was transferred to its present location, Desborough Warren Quarry, Northamptonshire, in March 1951 and was due for withdrawal in July.  It is believed to be the oldest Hudswell-Clarke locomotive still in working order and once carried the number 15.  Now it has no number or name, although known as “Sheepbridge No.25”.

Painted in apple green it should be a valuable addition to stock already acquired, and will be of considerable use at the Chasewater branch line which has been leased by this group.

Two other locomotives have also been donated by the Whitecross Co. of Warrington.  They are Peckett 0-4-0STs of 1900 and 1904 vintage.  They were withdrawn from service by the Company in 1961, being replaced by two Fowler diesel locomotives.  They carried names up to withdrawal, the older being “Baden Powell” and the younger “Lancet” the nameplates of the latter being transferred to the Diesel No.1, and those of the former being acquired by local enthusiasts.  Only “Lancet” will be able to run again.  It is hoped to exhibit “Baden Powell” statically.

The second is about new locomotives coming to Chasewater.  Sadly the Hudswell Clarke, although we still have the loco, has never steamed here. The two Pecketts fared even worse.  The ‘Lance’ (not Lancet) 1038/1906 was scrapped in March 1972, and another Peckett – 1823/1931 was also scrapped at the same time.  The Loco ‘Baden Powell’ was in too bad a condition to be moved.  The other loco was an 0-4-0F a fireless Andrew Barclay locomotive 1562/1917 – scrapped in March 1973.
The articles were writtten in 1965, the photos taken in 1969.

Some old photos of Asbestos

Some old photos of Asbestos

We have been given some more old photos, I think from Steve Organ’s collection. These are some photos of Asbestos in the early days  at Chasewater Railway .

Click on a photo for a larger version.

Asbestos

The Chasewater Railway Engine

Hawthorn, Leslie 0-4-0ST, 2780 of 1909.  Built at the company’s Forth Bank Works, Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

 The loco has outside cylinders 14” diameter x 22” stroke, 3’6” driving wheels with a fixed wheelbase of 5’6”.  Weight in working order 27.5 tons.

Delivered when new to Washington Chemical Company, County Durham, which became a subsidiary of the Turner and Newall Company Ltd. in 1920.

A large industrial complex served by sidings and a half mile branch just south of Washington station on the line between Pelaw and Penshaw, the locomotive working here until 1933, when transferred to Turner and Newall, Trafford Park Works, Manchester.

The locomotive came to Chasewater in 1968 from the Turner and Newall factory, Trafford Park, Manchester, where asbestos was produced – hence the name.  The company asked for £100 for the loco and was asked if they could wait while the Preservation Society could organize a raffle, being short of funds.  Upon realizing the situation, the company generously waived the fee and donated the loco.

Chasewater Railway ran an “Asbestos Day Special” on 1st January 2012 from 10 am to 5 pm. This event marked the end of 1909 built Hawthorn Leslie No.2780 “Asbestos” 0-4-0ST’s current time in traffic and it’s 10 year steam ticket. The one day event will see Chasewater’s favourite steam engine, 102 year old Asbestos providing traction. Resident loco RSH 0-6-0 No.7684 Nechells No.4 was also in steam to accompany Asbestos on her last day as was Barclay loco ‘Colin McAndrew’. It was a time of celebration for the railway owned locomotive which is always very popular with our visitors, and it has been the main stay of service at the colliery line having arrived over 40 years ago. Shortly after the event Asbestos is going to be retired to undergo a heavy general overhaul. Subject to the required funds being raised we expect that the work needed to return it to traffic should take approximately three years to complete.

At the time of writing, June 2018, the money required to return the loco to traffic has been collected and available, but the time hasn’t!

Made In Staffordshire Gala – May 26th/27th/28th

Made In Staffordshire Gala

May 26th/27th/28th

 

Kerr Stuart & Co. 0-4-0 “Willy” the Well-tank (RMWeb)

Bagnall 0-4-0DH built Stafford 1961, number 3207 “Leys” (Foxfield)

 

Events News: Made In Staffordshire Gala – May 26th/27th/28th

Made in Staffordshire Gala

Our Chasewater Railway Made in Staffordshire gala May 26th/27th/28th. 10am-5pm each day.

Details of our locos appearing during the gala.over the upcoming Bank Holiday weekend “Made in Staffordshire”

Steam loco guest is Kerr Stuart & Co. 0-4-0 “Willy” the Well-tank visiting us in its centennial year having been built in Staffordshire in 1918 and Diesel guest is last but one built Bagnall 0-4-0DH built Stafford 1961, number 3207 “Leys”. Thanks to the respective owners for allowing them to visit us.

Home fleet locos representing Staffordshire are Bagnall “Dunlop No.6” and Bagnall “Kent No.2” plus Diesel E E Baguley “Bass no.5” with Bagnall “Myfanwy” availble to view nearing the completion of her restoration.

Museum, Heritage Centre, Tea Room, Model Railway, Gift shops, Bric-A-Brac and more.

Rover Ticket prices for this event are £8.95 Adult, £7.95 Concession, £4.50 Child 3-15yrs and Non-working members with valid card, 0-2yrs free. A fantastic value family ticket is £24.95 for 2 adults and up to 2 children. No passes or vouchers valid during the gala and for everyone’s safety strictly no track/shed/signal box access without permission.

For weather & travel updates why not tune into our friends at Cannock Chase Radio FM on 89.6 & 94 FM.

There are many exhibits in the Museum made and/or used in Staffordshire – pop in and see us!

Hope to see you there.

More info:   http://www.chasewaterrailway.co.uk/

Railway Preservation Society (WM Div), later Chasewater Railway, Rolling Stock at Cannock & Rugeley Colliery

Railway Preservation Society (West Midlands Division), later

Chasewater Railway, Rolling Stock at Cannock & Rugeley Colliery

This photo was given to the Museum by Rob Cadman

RPS, Chasewater Railway, Rolling Stock at Cannock & Rugeley Colliery – Photo – Our thanks to Rob Cadman

A very interesting photograph from c May 1970, Railway Preservation Society (West Midlands Division), later Chasewater Light Railway, prior to removal from its original home in Hednesford to its new home at Chasewater.

During the spring and summer of 1970 the stock was moved to the yard of Cannock Wood colliery by NCB locos for ease of loading for the final move by road to Chasewater.  The two bogie coaches were moved by Wrekin Roadways at no cost to the Society.  Other items were delivered to Chasewater by the NCB, the only charge being for the move of loco ‘Cannock Wood’.

The vehicles in the photo are: a 7-plank coal wagon, the E1 loco ‘Cannock Wood’ (now on the Isle of Wight), the Midland Railway Royal Saloon, built 1910.  This was loaned to Derby Corporation for the embryonic Midland Railway Project.  It was later exchanged for the ex-Walsall Gas Works Sentinel, some equipment and cash.  This vehicle is now at the Midland Railway – Butterley.  The other steam loco is ‘Hem Heath No.1’, a Bagnall 0-6-0ST 3077 of 1955, ex Silverdale, which actually worked at Cannock Wood.  Between the left-hand window of Cannock Wood and the edge of the photo our Cadbury Van can be seen in the distance.

Chasewater Railway Museum – Newsletter, May 2018

Chasewater Railway Museum

Newsletter, May 2018

May 2018