Tag Archives: Norton Canes

Another new addition to the collection – Coat of Arms, Maryort & Carlisle Railway

Another new addition to the collection,

Coat of Arms of the

Maryport & Carlisle Railway

Chasewater Railway has a 6-wheeled coach which belonged to the Maryport and Carlisle Railway, before being used as part of the Paddy Train at Cannock and Rugeley Colliery Pit at Cannock Wood.  The Coat of Arms is a long sought-after object for the Museum.

There were 27 subsidiary companies in the group of railways which made up the LMS, but only a handful of them owned locomotives and rolling stock.

The oldest was the Maryport & Carlisle, which was incorporated as long ago as 1837.  It was opened in instalments and completed throughout on 10th February 1845, eventually owning nearly 43 route miles of line.  It enjoyed an enviable dividend record, which rose to a peak of 13% in 1873, and it was one of the most prosperous of all British railways over a long period of years.  It contributed 33 locomotives, 71 coaching vehicles and 1,404 freight vehicles to the LMS.

Two early types of transfer for the decoration of the coaching stock, which was given a varnished teak external finish at the time, have been traced.  One was a conventional script monogram.  The other consisted of the initials ‘MCR’ on a red field surrounded by an Oxford blue garter with the usual gilt edging, ornamentation and legend bearing the full title.   It measures 9¼ in wide X 11¼ in high over black shading.

A livery of green with white upper panels was adopted in 1905 for the passenger train vehicles, which blended pleasantly with the green of the locomotives.  Five years later Tearnes produced for display on both an armorial device which shared with that of the Central London the distinction of embodying neither name nor motto.

The transfer measures 10¼in wide X 16¾in high and is simple and appropriate.  On an ornamental shield Maryport (top left) and Carlisle (bottom right) are quartered with the arms of J.P. Senhouse of Netherall (top right), represented by the popinjay, and those of Sir Wilfred Lawson (bottom left).  Senhouse and Lawson were the first and fourth chairmen the company had during its eighty-five years of life.

Uniform buttons carried the same device.

Chasewater Railway Museum – August Newsletter

Chasewater Railway Museum

August Newsletter

Coming very soon – Burton Brewery Locomotives Day – Sunday July 15th 2018

Coming very soon –

Burton Brewery Locomotives Day

Chasewater Railway Museum July Newsletter

Chasewater Railway Museum

July Newsletter

 

 

Another from Steve Organ’s collection – the man himself!

Another from Steve Organ’s collection

the man himself!

On the right track!  Chasewater Railway General Manager Steve Organ cheers the news that the line extension can continue as Lorne Grey, who is in charge of Centrac’s recycling operations, gives the project the green flag.  July 1998.

Some old photos of The Causeway

Some old photos of The Causeway

We have been given some more old photos, I think from Steve Organ’s collection. These are some photos of the causeway in the early days  at Chasewater Railway .

In 1982 the Preservation Society was forced to lift the track on the Causeway and commence work on an ambitious rebuilding scheme. Sadly owing to the Society’s finances and lack of support, the scheme collapsed and the Preservation Society was forced to close to passenger traffic for a number of years, even though work continued on basic restoration at the Brownhills West site.

A scheme to restore the Causeway commenced in May 1993, with the basic engineering elements being completed some 11 months later. Approx. 120,000 tons of fill material were imported on to the site for grading and compaction. With the completion of one of the largest civil engineering schemes in railway preservation to be carried out to date, work was able to proceed with the opening of Norton Lakeside Station. The station was opened in December 1995.

Click on a photo for a larger version.

Some old photos of Asbestos

Some old photos of Asbestos

We have been given some more old photos, I think from Steve Organ’s collection. These are some photos of Asbestos in the early days  at Chasewater Railway .

Click on a photo for a larger version.

Asbestos

The Chasewater Railway Engine

Hawthorn, Leslie 0-4-0ST, 2780 of 1909.  Built at the company’s Forth Bank Works, Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

 The loco has outside cylinders 14” diameter x 22” stroke, 3’6” driving wheels with a fixed wheelbase of 5’6”.  Weight in working order 27.5 tons.

Delivered when new to Washington Chemical Company, County Durham, which became a subsidiary of the Turner and Newall Company Ltd. in 1920.

A large industrial complex served by sidings and a half mile branch just south of Washington station on the line between Pelaw and Penshaw, the locomotive working here until 1933, when transferred to Turner and Newall, Trafford Park Works, Manchester.

The locomotive came to Chasewater in 1968 from the Turner and Newall factory, Trafford Park, Manchester, where asbestos was produced – hence the name.  The company asked for £100 for the loco and was asked if they could wait while the Preservation Society could organize a raffle, being short of funds.  Upon realizing the situation, the company generously waived the fee and donated the loco.

Chasewater Railway ran an “Asbestos Day Special” on 1st January 2012 from 10 am to 5 pm. This event marked the end of 1909 built Hawthorn Leslie No.2780 “Asbestos” 0-4-0ST’s current time in traffic and it’s 10 year steam ticket. The one day event will see Chasewater’s favourite steam engine, 102 year old Asbestos providing traction. Resident loco RSH 0-6-0 No.7684 Nechells No.4 was also in steam to accompany Asbestos on her last day as was Barclay loco ‘Colin McAndrew’. It was a time of celebration for the railway owned locomotive which is always very popular with our visitors, and it has been the main stay of service at the colliery line having arrived over 40 years ago. Shortly after the event Asbestos is going to be retired to undergo a heavy general overhaul. Subject to the required funds being raised we expect that the work needed to return it to traffic should take approximately three years to complete.

At the time of writing, June 2018, the money required to return the loco to traffic has been collected and available, but the time hasn’t!

More old photos – diesels, etc.

More old photos – diesels, etc.

We have been given some more old photos, I think from Steve Organ’s collection.  These are some of the old diesel/petrol locos which were at Chasewater Railway early on.

Click on a photo for a larger version.

 

 

Chasewater Railway Museum – June Newsletter

Chasewater Railway Museum

June Newsletter

Chasewater Railway’s Volunteer Day

Chasewater Railway’s Volunteer Day