Tag Archives: Cannock & Rugeley Colliery

Chasewater Railway Museum – February 2019 Newsletter

Chasewater Railway Museum

February 2019 Newsletter

Another new addition to the collection – Coat of Arms, Maryort & Carlisle Railway

Another new addition to the collection,

Coat of Arms of the

Maryport & Carlisle Railway

Chasewater Railway has a 6-wheeled coach which belonged to the Maryport and Carlisle Railway, before being used as part of the Paddy Train at Cannock and Rugeley Colliery Pit at Cannock Wood.  The Coat of Arms is a long sought-after object for the Museum.

There were 27 subsidiary companies in the group of railways which made up the LMS, but only a handful of them owned locomotives and rolling stock.

The oldest was the Maryport & Carlisle, which was incorporated as long ago as 1837.  It was opened in instalments and completed throughout on 10th February 1845, eventually owning nearly 43 route miles of line.  It enjoyed an enviable dividend record, which rose to a peak of 13% in 1873, and it was one of the most prosperous of all British railways over a long period of years.  It contributed 33 locomotives, 71 coaching vehicles and 1,404 freight vehicles to the LMS.

Two early types of transfer for the decoration of the coaching stock, which was given a varnished teak external finish at the time, have been traced.  One was a conventional script monogram.  The other consisted of the initials ‘MCR’ on a red field surrounded by an Oxford blue garter with the usual gilt edging, ornamentation and legend bearing the full title.   It measures 9¼ in wide X 11¼ in high over black shading.

A livery of green with white upper panels was adopted in 1905 for the passenger train vehicles, which blended pleasantly with the green of the locomotives.  Five years later Tearnes produced for display on both an armorial device which shared with that of the Central London the distinction of embodying neither name nor motto.

The transfer measures 10¼in wide X 16¾in high and is simple and appropriate.  On an ornamental shield Maryport (top left) and Carlisle (bottom right) are quartered with the arms of J.P. Senhouse of Netherall (top right), represented by the popinjay, and those of Sir Wilfred Lawson (bottom left).  Senhouse and Lawson were the first and fourth chairmen the company had during its eighty-five years of life.

Uniform buttons carried the same device.

Railway Preservation Society (WM Div), later Chasewater Railway, Rolling Stock at Cannock & Rugeley Colliery

Railway Preservation Society (West Midlands Division), later

Chasewater Railway, Rolling Stock at Cannock & Rugeley Colliery

This photo was given to the Museum by Rob Cadman

RPS, Chasewater Railway, Rolling Stock at Cannock & Rugeley Colliery – Photo – Our thanks to Rob Cadman

A very interesting photograph from c May 1970, Railway Preservation Society (West Midlands Division), later Chasewater Light Railway, prior to removal from its original home in Hednesford to its new home at Chasewater.

During the spring and summer of 1970 the stock was moved to the yard of Cannock Wood colliery by NCB locos for ease of loading for the final move by road to Chasewater.  The two bogie coaches were moved by Wrekin Roadways at no cost to the Society.  Other items were delivered to Chasewater by the NCB, the only charge being for the move of loco ‘Cannock Wood’.

The vehicles in the photo are: a 7-plank coal wagon, the E1 loco ‘Cannock Wood’ (now on the Isle of Wight), the Midland Railway Royal Saloon, built 1910.  This was loaned to Derby Corporation for the embryonic Midland Railway Project.  It was later exchanged for the ex-Walsall Gas Works Sentinel, some equipment and cash.  This vehicle is now at the Midland Railway – Butterley.  The other steam loco is ‘Hem Heath No.1’, a Bagnall 0-6-0ST 3077 of 1955, ex Silverdale, which actually worked at Cannock Wood.  Between the left-hand window of Cannock Wood and the edge of the photo our Cadbury Van can be seen in the distance.

A New Year – New Items in the Museum

Chasewater Railway Museum

New Year – New Items

Three very nice items in the museum to start the New Year. 

They are the cabside numbers from nos. 1, 5 and 8 from local colliery locos.

Number 1 is from the Cannock & Rugeley loco – ‘Marquis’

The name originates from the first Marquis of Anglesey, a title awarded to the Earl of Uxbridge who fought along side Wellington at the Battle of Waterloo. Carried by the Lilleshall Company built 0-6-0 saddle tank new to the Cannock and Rugeley Collieries as their first loco in 1867, she or is it he lasted until cut up at the NCB Cannock Central Workshops during May 1964.

 

No.5 is from Cannock & Rugeley loco  ‘Beaudesert’

Beaudesert from the little 0-6-0 saddle tank built by Fox Walker, works number 266 of 1875 supplied new to Cannock and Rugeley Collieries as their number 5. Beaudesert was the ancestral home of the Paget family who became Earls of Uxbridge before being given the title and Estate Marquis of Anglesey. Finally cut up in 1964 the other nameplate of the loco survives and is on display in Kidderminster Railway Museum.

No.8 is from Cannock & Rugeley loco ‘Harrison’

No.8 Harrison 0-6-0 T  Built by the Yorkshire Engine Company, 186/1872 as a 2-4-0 T, rebuilt to 0-6-0T 1916.  Bought from B.P.Blockley of Bloxwich in 1905.  It had originally been Potteries, Shrewsbury and North Wales Railway ‘Hope’ and later No.1 on the East and West Junction Railway.  Sold to Stanton Ironworks, Stanton, Notts., 1950.  Since scrapped.

Chasewater Railway Museum Catalogue – Album 1, Local Colliery Locos

Chasewater Railway Museum Catalogue

Album 1, Local Colliery Locos

This photograph album contains photos of locomotives used in collieries local to Cannock Chase, Cannock & Rugeley Colliery and Cannock Chase Colliery in particular.

Click here to see list of all photos – Album 1 Local Pit Locos – XL Files

The text on the pics is – Object number, description and manufacturer.

Click on a pic for a larger version and use the side arrows to move on.

 

 

Chasewater Railway Museum Catalogue – Cannock & Rugeley Colliery Archives

Chasewater Railway Museum Catalogue 

Cannock & Rugeley Colliery Archives

A few items of paperwork from one of the local collieries.

Click on the link below to see the full list

All CRC Archives – XL Files

Caption text: Object number, name, description, location in the museum.

Click on a picture to see a larger image, the click on the side arrow to move on.

Chasewater Railway Museum – An Addition to our collection of Armbands

Chasewater Railway Museum

An Addition to our collection of Armbands

Armbands in case.jpg 

The later years of the 19th century saw increasing standardization on the railways, not least in the armbands worn by three types of railway worker – pilotmen, flagmen and lookout men.  The one worn by pilotmen was issued by the signal department and was made of red cloth with white stitched letters, and was secured by leather or elastic straps.

The armbands for flagmen and lookout men were made of enamelled steel plate, cut into an oval and shaped to fit the arm.  A pair of slots was cut into the plate, through which a pair of leather straps, with buckles, was attached.  Issued by the permanent way department, these enamel armbands were finished in white with red lettering.

A pilotman was a signal department employee whose job was to ride on the locomotive acting as a kind of human staff or token if the signalling on a single line failed, or if there was an accident or obstruction which closed one of the lines of a double track.  No train could proceed without him in such an emergency, so that the possibility of a head-on collision was avoided.

The lookout man was quite simply that.  His job was to keep a sharp lookout when a permanent way gang was working on the track, and to give a warning for it to stand clear as soon as he saw an approaching train.

The flagman was another permanent way ganger, who used green, yellow or red flags to communicate with signalmen or other permanent way staff who were out of audible range.All three posts were – and still are – crucial to the safety of both passengers and railway employees, and armbands were issued to emphasize this fact and to avoid misunderstandings.  A modern variety, coloured pale blue with white letters, was used on British Rail.

London, Midland & Scottish Railway Armband.

317

This armband is still my favourite.  A brass Cannock & Rugeley Colliery Main Line Pilot Armband, dug up in a field by a farmer while ploughing some years ago – considerably battered and bent over double!

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Chasewater Railway Museum – Some very local Midland Railway mineral invoices

Chasewater Railway Museum

Some Midland Railway mineral invoices

Some of these passed through the site of the Chasewater Railway’s Brownhills West Station, and others started at Walsall Wood.

(Click to enlarge)

The Midland Railway Walsall Wood Extension Railway

In 1880 the Midland Railway gained permission to build their long-awaited foothold into the Cannock Chase coalfield.  The Walsall Wood Extension Railway would enable them to link their line from Aldridge with the Cannock Chase & Wolverhampton Railway near Chasewater.

The line opened in 1882 to bring coal out of the pits, but two years later, was also opened to passenger traffic as far as the Brownhills Midland Railway Station, between the Chester Road and the A5.  The passenger service was not a great success and was closed in 1930.

The Midland Railway continued as a mineral only line until September 1960 when, following the demise of the coalfield, it was closed.

The Brownhills West Station and the first half-mile or so of the track of the Chasewater Railway is on the former Midland Railway line.

 

 

Chasewater Railway Museum – our latest item

Chasewater Railway Museum

Our latest item

DSCF2492

Thanks to Rob Cadman, who spotted the item on ebay, we were able to obtain, at a reasonable price, a small wagon repair plate somewhat unusually produced in a lead material, and CRC (Cannock & Rugeley Colliery) in origin, when they replaced an ex Midland Railway wagon – number 74545  6-1943.  Size, approximately 6″x 4″ .  Very likely this was a 12 ton coal wagon but this is not yet verified.

Many of these old Midland Railway wagons were withdrawn in the 1920s and 30s and replaced by the LMS.

 

Chasewater Railway Museum – Local loan item now on display

Chasewater Railway Museum

Local Loan item now on display

V.V.V.

VVV Info

Our thanks to Alan Dean and the Committee of the Cannock Chase Mining Historical Society for allowing the Chasewater Railway Museum to display this plaque.

Chasewater Railway is known as the Colliery Line – if there had been no coal mines there would be no railway!

Also thanks to the Chasewater Railway members who helped to put the plaque in position – it’s not the lightest of objects!