Model of the Cannock & Rugeley Paddy Train

Model of the Cannock & Rugeley Colliery

Paddy Train

In late 2017 the  Chasewater Railway Museum was handed a query from Ray Foster with regard to the Cannock & Rugeley Colliery  Paddy Train, which ran from Hednesford to the colliery in Cannock Wood

We have tried to answer one or two other queries in the time since, the latest ones being about the loco and the size of the nameplate, numberplate and the size of the letters ‘CRC’ on the tanks.  Some of the items are in the Museum collection so it was relatively simple to be of help.  Now that Ray has completed his ‘0’ gauge model, he has sent us a photograph of the complete train.  A first class job!

If anyone is interested in getting the parts for the train Ray can direct them to the sources, just add your details in a comment on the blog post.

Our congratulations to Ray on the completion of his model and our thanks for allowing the use of the photograph.

Cannock Chase Mining Historical Society Books

 Cannock Chase Mining Historical Society Books

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Did you or one of your family work at one of the many Collieries in the Cannock & Rugeley area. If so why not get one of the mining books published by the Cannock Chase Mining Historical Society. There are 18 books in the series, each one covering one or more of the local Collieries. A very informative collection, written by the miners, who worked at them. These are available from Chasewater Railway Museum. Perhaps an ideal Christmas present. Contact me if you need more information.

Godfrey Hucker – 07751 448523

Chasewater Railway Museum Catalogue – Cannock & Rugeley Colliery Objects

Chasewater Railway Museum Catalogue 

Cannock & Rugeley Colliery Objects

As there was not a great deal in our Archive collection of the Cannock & Rugeley Collieries, we thought that we would include the other objects which we have from the Collieries.

Click on the link below to see the full list

All CRC Objects XL Files 16-3-2018

Caption text: Object number, name, description, location in the museum.

Click on a picture to see a larger image, the click on the side arrow to move on.

 

Chasewater Railway Museum – A New Boundary Marker

Chasewater Railway Museum

A New Local Boundary Marker

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A recent purchase for the collection – a Cannock & Rugeley Colliery Boundary Marker.

Other boundary markers in the collection are shown below.

 

Boundary Markers

 In their heyday, the railways were the biggest landowners in Britain after the Church, and it was inevitable that boundary disputes sometimes arose.  It was to resolve this problem that many railways designed boundary posts or markers.

The oldest tend to be in stone, while those from about 1870 onwards are in cast iron – some companies using lengths of surplus rail, suitably inscribed.

The Great Western Railway (GWR) markers were made of Brunel-designed bridge rails cut into lengths, with an angle iron T-piece on the bottom, and a cast iron top, moulded round the rail.  Between 1880 and 1920, the year of manufacture was included on the cast top.  The Midland Railway (MR) used pieces of ordinary bull-head rail whose tops were stamped into an oval shape, with the raised letters ‘MR’.

These two types are by far the most common available to collectors, though the cast iron posts of the London & North Western Railway (LNWR) and Great Northern Railway (GNR) are also frequently seen.

It appears that several railways never had any boundary posts, and no examples are known from the Great Eastern, London, Brighton & South Coast, South Eastern & Chatham, or from any of the five main Scottish lines.

On the other hand, two of the small South Wales companies had boundary posts which often come up for sale – the Barry and Rhondda & Swansea Bay railways.  The GWR, MR, GNR and LNWR all made boundary posts for their joint lines, and some of these are both exotic and extremely rare.

For example, the GWR produced posts for an area of land at Reading which abutted with the South Eastern& Chatham.  This was the only meeting point of the two companies, and just two markers are known to exist, both dated 1915.

Boundary markers are usually placed in the fence line at the side of the railway, or in adjacent land by bridges, viaducts or crossings.

Chasewater Railway Museum – And another visiting loco

Chasewater Railway Museum

And another visiting loco – Including video

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Wimblebury

A Hunslet 0-6-0ST Austerity class, 3839/1956

Built by Hunslet of Leeds, Wimblebury was delivered new to the National Coal Board at Cannock Wood Colliery near Hednesford in Staffordshire, and worked there until withdrawn in the early 1970s. Originally earmarked for spares for another engine, Wimblebury was purchased privately for preservation and moved to the Foxfield Railway in Staffordshire on 26th September 1973.

This, in 2009, is the second visit to Chasewater by this popular engine in recent years.

05164 Wimblebury 0-6-0ST Hunslett 3839-1956 CRC Taken Hazel Slade

Passing over Hazel Slade level crossing.

Train

 

 

Chasewater Railway Museum – Beaudesert Nameplate

Chasewater Railway Museum 

Beaudesert Nameplate

Beaudesert

The third nameplate, following those of ‘McClean’ and ‘Marquis’,  is that of Beaudesert from the little 0-6-0 saddle tank built by Fox Walker, works number 266 of 1875 supplied new to Cannock and Rugeley Collieries as their number 5. Beaudesert was the ancestral home of the Paget family who became Earls of Uxbridge before being given the title and Estate Marquis of Anglesey. Finally cut up in 1964 the other nameplate of the loco survives and is on display in Kidderminster Railway Museum.

05029 No.5 Beaudesert 0-6-0ST Fox Walker 266-1875 C & R‘Beaudesert’  0-6-0ST  Built by Fox Walker  No. 266 – 1875

No.5 at Cannock & Rugeley Colliery

 

 

Chasewater Railway Museum – Marquis Nameplate

Chasewater Railway Museum

Marquis Nameplate

Marquis

After ‘McClean’, the second of the three locomotive nameplates to arrive is Marquis. The name originates from the first Marquis of Anglesey, a title awarded to the Earl of Uxbridge who fought along side Wellington at the Battle of Waterloo. Carried by the Lilleshall Company built 0-6-0 saddle tank new to the Cannock and Rugeley Collieries as their first loco in 1867, she, or is it he, lasted until cut up at the NCB Cannock Central Workshops during May 1964.

05001 No.1 Marquis 0-6-0ST Lilleshall 1867 newLilleshall locomotive 0-6-0ST No.116 of 1867  ‘Marquis’ Cannock & Rugeley Collieries’ No.1